1976 South Carolina Code of Laws
Unannotated
Updated through the end of the 2000 Session

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Title 7 - Elections

CHAPTER 13.

CONDUCT OF ELECTIONS

ARTICLE 1.

WHEN, WHERE AND HOW ELECTIONS HELD

SECTION 7-13-10. Time of general elections for Federal, State and county officers; conduct of general and special elections.



General elections for Federal, State and county officers in this State shall be held on the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November in each even-numbered year at such voting places as have been or may be established by law. All general or special elections held pursuant to the Constitution of this State shall be regulated and conducted according to the rules, principles and provisions herein prescribed.

SECTION 7-13-15. Primaries to be conducted by State Election Commission and county election commissions on second Tuesday in June.

Except for municipal primaries, all primaries for national offices, excluding the Office of President, and all primaries for state offices, offices including more than one county, and countywide and less than countywide offices, specifically including, but not limited to, all school boards and school trustees, special purpose district offices, which include, but are not limited to, water, sewer, fire, soil conservation, and other similar district offices, must be conducted by the State Election Commission and the county election commissions on the second Tuesday in June of each general election year.

SECTION 7-13-20. Time of general election for certain county officers.



There shall be a general election for county supervisors, county superintendents of education, sheriffs, coroners and clerks of the courts of common pleas held in each county at every alternate general election, reckoning from the year 1960, except in those counties in which the term of office of any such officers may be for a period other than four years. In such cases elections to fill such offices shall be held at the general election next preceding the expiration of any such term of office.

SECTION 7-13-30. Time of election of probate judges.



The probate judge in every county shall be elected at every alternate general election, reckoning from the year 1958.

SECTION 7-13-35. Notice of general, municipal, special, and primary elections.

The authority charged by law with conducting an election must publish two notices of general, municipal, special, and primary elections held in the county in a newspaper of general circulation in the county or municipality, as appropriate. Included in each notice must be a reminder of the last day persons may register to be eligible to vote in the election for which notice is given, notification of the date, time, and location of the hearing on ballots challenged in the election, a list of the precincts involved in the election, the location of the polling places in each of the precincts, and notification that the process of examining the return-addressed envelopes containing absentee ballots may begin at 2:00 p.m. on election day at a place designated in the notice by the authority charged with conducting the election. The first notice must appear not later than sixty days before the election and the second notice must appear not later than two weeks after the first notice.

SECTION 7-13-40. Time of party primary; certification of names; verification of candidates' qualifications; filing fee.

In the event that a party nominates candidates by party primary, a party primary must be held by the party and conducted by the State Election Commission and the respective county election commissions on the second Tuesday in June of each general election year, and a second and third primary each two weeks successively thereafter, if necessary. Written certification of the names of all candidates to be placed on primary ballots must be made by the political party chairman, vice chairman, or secretary to the State Election Commission or the county election commission, whichever is responsible under law for preparing the ballot, not later than twelve o'clock noon on April ninth, or if April ninth falls on a Saturday or Sunday, not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday. Political parties nominating candidates by party primary must verify the qualifications of those candidates prior to certification to the appropriate election commission of the names of candidates to be placed on primary ballots. The written verification required by this section must contain a statement that each candidate certified meets, or will meet by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, the qualifications for office for which he has filed. Political parties must not accept the filing of any candidate who does not or will not by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, meet the qualifications for the office for which the candidate desires to file, and such candidate's name shall not be placed on a primary ballot. The filing fees for all candidates filing to run in all primaries, except municipal primaries, must be transmitted by the respective political parties to the State Election Commission and placed by the executive director of the commission in a special account designated for use in conducting primary elections and must be used for that purpose. The filing fee for each office is one percent of the total salary for the term of that office or one hundred dollars, whichever amount is greater.

SECTION 7-13-45. Filing as candidate.

In every general election year, the county chairman shall:

(1) designate a specified place other than a private residence where persons may file a statement of intention of candidacy;

(2) designate a specified place other than a private residence where persons may file as candidates;

(3) establish regular hours of not less than four hours a day during the final seventy-two hours of the filing period in which he or some person he designates must be present at the designated place to accept filings;

(4) place an advertisement to appear two weeks before the filing period begins in a newspaper of general circulation in the county at least five by seven inches in size that notifies the public of the dates of the filing periods, the offices which may be filed for, the place and street address where filings may be made, and the hours that an authorized person will be present to receive filings.

SECTION 7-13-50. Second and other primaries.

A second primary, when necessary, must be held two weeks after the first and is subject to the rules governing the first primary. At the second primary the two candidates among those who do not withdraw their candidacies and who received more votes in the first primary than any other remaining candidate alone shall run for any one office and if only one candidate remains, he is considered nominated, except that if there are two or more vacancies for any particular office, the number of candidates must be double the number of vacancies to be filled if so many candidates remain. In all second primaries the candidate receiving the largest number of votes cast for a given office must be declared the nominee for the office whether or not he has received a majority of the votes cast for that office, and when there are several candidates for several different offices, then the several candidates receiving the largest number of votes for the several positions are considered as nominated for the offices whether or not they received a majority of the votes cast. Other primaries, if necessary, must be ordered in a similar manner by the county election commission or the State Election Commission, as appropriate.

SECTION 7-13-60. Hours polls open.

The polls must be opened at seven o'clock a.m. and closed at seven o'clock p.m. the day of election and must be held open during these hours without intermission or adjournment.

SECTION 7-13-70. Appointment of county commissioners of election and managers of election.



For the purpose of carrying on general or special elections provided for in Section 7-13-10, the Governor, at least ninety days before the election, must appoint for each county not less than three nor more than five commissioners of election upon the recommendation of the senatorial delegation and at least half of the members of the House of Representatives from the respective counties. The Governor must notify the State Election Commission in writing of the appointments. The State Election Commission must verify that at least one of the appointees represents the largest political party and one represents the second largest political party as determined by the composition of that county's delegation in the General Assembly or the makeup of the General Assembly as a whole if the county's delegation is composed of only one party's members. The commissioners shall continue in office until their successors are appointed and qualified. After their appointment the commissioners must take and subscribe, before any officer authorized to administer oaths, the following oath of office prescribed by Section 26 of Article III of the Constitution: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I am duly qualified, according to the Constitution of this State, to exercise the duties of the office to which I have been appointed, and that I will, to the best of my ability, discharge the duties thereof, and preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of this State and of the United States. So help me God".

The oath must be immediately filed in the office of the clerk of court of common pleas of the county in which the commissioners are appointed, or if there is no clerk of court, in the office of the Secretary of State.

Commissioners and such staff as designated by the commission must complete, within eighteen months after their appointment or reappointment, a training and certification program conducted by the State Election Commission. Following initial certification, each commission member and staff person designated by the commission must take at least one training course each year.

SECTION 7-13-72. Managers of election.

For the general election held on the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November in each even-numbered year, the commissioners of election must appoint three managers of election for each polling place in the county for which they must respectively be appointed for each five hundred electors, or portion of each five hundred electors, registered to vote at the polling place.

For primary elections held on the second Tuesday in June of each general election year, the commissioners of election must appoint three managers of election for each polling place in the county for which they must respectively be appointed for the first five hundred electors registered to vote in each precinct in the county, and may appoint three additional managers for each five hundred electors registered to vote in the precinct above the first five hundred electors, or portion thereof. The commissioners must also appoint from among the managers a clerk for each polling place in the county, and none of the officers may be removed from office except for incompetence or misconduct.

For all other primary, special, or municipal elections, the authority charged by law with conducting the primary, special, or municipal elections must appoint three managers of election for the first five hundred electors registered to vote in each precinct in the county, municipality, or other election district and one additional manager for each five hundred electors registered to vote in the precinct above the first five hundred electors. The authority responsible by law for conducting the election must also appoint from among the managers a clerk for each polling place in a primary, special, or municipal election.

Forty-five days prior to any primary, except municipal primaries, each political party holding a primary may submit to the county election commission a list of prospective managers for each precinct. The county election commission must appoint at least one manager for each precinct from the list of names submitted by each political party holding a primary. However, the county election commission may refuse to appoint any prospective manager for good cause.

No person may be appointed as a manager in a primary, general, or special election who has not completed a training program approved by the State Election Commission concerning his duties and responsibilities as a poll manager and who has not received certification of having completed the training program. The training program and the issuance of certification must be carried out by the county election commission. After their appointment, the managers and clerks must take and subscribe, before any officer authorized to administer oaths, the following oath of office prescribed by Section 26 of Article III of the Constitution: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I am duly qualified, according to the Constitution of this State, to exercise the duties of the office to which I have been appointed, and that I will, to the best of my ability, discharge the duties thereof, and preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of this State and of the United States. So help me God".

The oath must be immediately filed in the office of the clerk of court of common pleas of the county in which the managers and clerks are appointed, or if there is no clerk of court, in the office of the Secretary of State. Before opening the polls, the managers of election must take and subscribe the oath provided for in Section 7-13-100. Upon the completion of the canvassing of votes, this oath must be filed with the commissioners of election along with the ballots from that election precinct.

SECTION 7-13-75. Members of local election commissions; political activity prohibited.

No member of a county or municipal election commission, voter registration board, or combined election and voter registration commission may participate in political management or in a political campaign over whose election the member has jurisdiction during the member's term of office. No member may make a contribution to a candidate or knowingly attend a fundraiser held for the benefit of a candidate over whose election the member has jurisdiction. Violation of this section subjects the member to removal by the Governor or appropriate appointive authority.

SECTION 7-13-80. Organization of board of commissioners, managers and clerks; oaths.

The commissioners, managers, and clerks at their first meeting, respectively, must proceed to organize as a board. The county election commission must appoint the chairman of the board of managers. The chairman, in each instance, may administer oaths.

SECTION 7-13-90. [1962 Code Section 23-400.2; 1952 Code Section 23-376; 1950 (46) 2059, 2442; 1954 (48) 1447; 1966 (54) 2340][Am 1988 Act No. 422, Section 4] Repealed by 1992 Act No. 253 Section 17, eff February 19, 1992.

SECTION 7-13-100. Managers shall take oath before opening polls.

The managers before opening the polls, shall take and sign the following oath: "We do solemnly swear that we will conduct this election according to law and will allow no person to vote who is not entitled by law to vote in this election, and we will not unlawfully assist any voter to prepare his ballot and will not advise any voter as to how he should vote at this election."

SECTION 7-13-110. Poll managers to be residents and registered electors of counties; assistants.

All managers of election for the various polling places in the State must be residents and registered electors of the respective counties in which they are appointed to work or in an adjoining county. Any person at least sixteen years of age who has completed the training required by Section 7-13-72 and who is not otherwise disqualified by law may be appointed as a poll manager's assistant by the appropriate county election commission. Sixteen and seventeen-year-olds appointed as poll manager's assistants may not serve as chairman of the managers or clerk in the polling place to which they are appointed. They must serve under supervision of the chairman of the managers of the polling place and their specific duties must be prescribed by the county election commission. No polling place in this State may employ more than one sixteen or seventeen-year-old assistant poll manager.

SECTION 7-13-120. Candidates and their relatives shall not be managers or clerks.

(1) It shall be unlawful for a candidate or the spouse, parents, children, brothers or sisters of a candidate for public office to work as a manager or clerk of election at a polling place where such candidate's name appears on the ballot.

(2) Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction fined not more than one hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than thirty days.

SECTION 7-13-130. Managers' table; guard rail; general arrangement; preservation of right to vote and secrecy of ballot.

The polling places shall be provided with a table for the managers. The polls shall be provided with a guard rail, so that no one except as herein authorized shall approach nearer than five feet to the booths in which the voters are preparing their ballots. The managers at each voting place shall arrange the table, desk or other place upon which the ballot boxes shall be placed so that there shall be no crowding or confusion immediately around the boxes, and suitable means shall be provided to enable each voter to approach the boxes and deposit his ballot without interference or hindrance. The right to vote of each person so entitled and the secrecy of the ballot shall be preserved at all times.

SECTION 7-13-140. Maintenance of order; police powers of managers.

Managers of election are clothed with such police powers as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this article. The managers shall possess full authority to maintain good order at the polls and to enforce obedience to their lawful commands during an election and during the canvass and counting of the votes. All peace officers shall answer all such calls for help in preserving the peace as may be made by the managers of election.

SECTION 7-13-150. Penalty for failure to assist in maintaining order.

Any person who, when summoned or called upon by peace officers shall fail or refuse to assist him in maintaining the peace and good order at the polls shall be fined in a sum not to exceed one hundred dollars or imprisoned not to exceed thirty days.

SECTION 7-13-160. Peace officers shall enter polling place only on request or to vote.

No sheriff, deputy sheriff, policeman or other officers shall be allowed to come within the polling place except to vote unless summoned into it by a majority of the managers. On failure of any sheriff, deputy sheriff, policeman or other officer to comply with the provisions of the preceding sentence, the managers of election, or one of them, shall make affidavit against such sheriff, deputy sheriff, policeman or other officer for his arrest.

SECTION 7-13-170. Procedure when managers fail to attend, take charge of, or conduct election.

In case all of the managers shall fail to attend at the same time and place appointed for holding such poll or shall refuse or fail to act or in case no manager has been appointed for such poll, it shall be lawful for the voters present at the precinct voting place on that day to appoint from among the qualified voters of such precinct or club the managers to act as managers in the place and stead of the absent managers, and any one of the managers so appointed shall administer the oath to the other managers. But if the duly appointed managers attend in a reasonable time, they shall take charge of and conduct the election.

SECTION 7-13-180. Posting proposed constitutional amendments at polling place.

Whenever an amendment to the Constitution of this State shall be voted upon at any election, the commissioners of election of each county in the State shall have such amendment conspicuously posted at each voting precinct in the county upon the day of the election. Such printed amendments shall be furnished to the commissioners of election by the Secretary of State.

SECTION 7-13-190. Special elections to fill vacancies in office.

(A) Except as otherwise provided in this code as to specific offices, whenever a vacancy occurs in office by reason of death, resignation, or removal and the vacancy in office is one which is filled by a special election to complete the term of office, this section applies.

(B) In partisan elections, whether seeking nomination by political party primary or political party convention, filing by these candidates shall open for the office at twelve o'clock noon on the third Friday after the vacancy occurs for a period to close ten days later at twelve o'clock noon. If seeking nomination by petition, the petitions must be submitted not later than twelve o'clock noon, sixty days prior to the election. Verification of these petitions must be made not later than twelve o'clock noon forty-five days prior to the election. If seeking nomination by political party primary or political party convention, filing with the appropriate official is the same as provided in Section 7-11-15 and if seeking nomination by petition, filing with the appropriate official is the same as provided in Section 7-11-70.

A primary must be held on the eleventh Tuesday after the vacancy occurs. A runoff primary must be held on the thirteenth Tuesday after the vacancy occurs. The special election must be on the eighteenth Tuesday after the vacancy occurs. If the eighteenth Tuesday after the vacancy occurs is no more than sixty days prior to the general election, the special election shall be held on the same day as the general election. If the filing period closes on a state holiday, then filing must be held open through the succeeding weekday. If the date for an election falls on a state holiday, it must be set for the next succeeding Tuesday. For purposes of this section, state holiday does not mean the general election day.

(C) If the office is not one for which there are partisan elections, then the filing must be opened at noon on the third Friday after the vacancy occurs for a period to close ten days later at noon. The filing must be made to the same entity to which the nonpartisan officeholders would normally file for office in a general election year. The election must be set for the thirteenth Tuesday after the vacancy occurs. Both the filing date and the election date are subject to the provisions in subsection (B) of this section regarding holidays.

(D) Provided, however, if a vacancy occurs in more than one office in the same county requiring separate special elections to be held within a period of twenty-eight days under the provisions of this section, the election commission or other authority responsible for the conduct of the elections shall conduct all of the elections on the same date. The special elections must be held on the latest date required for an election during the twenty-eight-day period.

ARTICLE 3.

BALLOTS FOR GENERAL AND SPECIAL ELECTIONS

SECTION 7-13-310. Kinds of general election ballots; different colored paper shall be used.

In the general elections provided for in Section 7-13-10, there shall be four kinds of ballots called, respectively: "Official Ballot for Presidential Elector"; "Official Ballot for State Offices, United States Senator and Members of Congress"; "Official Ballot for State Senator, Member of the House of Representatives, County, Circuit and Other Offices" and "Official Ballot on Constitutional Amendments or other Propositions Submitted." Each such kind of ballot shall be printed upon different colored paper as shall be provided for by the executive director.

SECTION 7-13-320. Ballot standards and specifications.

General election ballots shall conform to the following standards and specifications:

(A) The ballot shall be printed on paper of such thickness that the printing cannot be distinguished from the back and shall be of such size and color as directed by the State Election Commission. If more than one ballot is to be used in any election, each such ballot shall be printed upon different colored paper;

(B) Across the top of the ballot shall be printed "Official Ballot, General Election," beneath which shall be printed the date of the election, the county and the precinct. Above the caption of each ballot shall be one stub, with a perforated line between the stub and the top of the ballot. The stub shall have printed thereon "Official Ballot, General Election" and then shall appear the name of the county, the precinct and the date of the election. On the right side there shall be a blank line under which there shall be "Initials of Issuing Officer." Stubs on ballots for each precinct shall be prenumbered consecutively, beginning with No. 1;

(C) On the ballot for presidential electors there shall be printed, under the titles of the offices, the names of the candidates for President and Vice President of the United States nominated by each political party qualified under the provisions of Section 7-9-10 and those nominated by petition. A separate column shall be assigned to each political party with candidates and to each separate petition slate of candidates on the ballot and each party and each petition candidate's columns shall be separated by distinct black lines. At the head of each column the party or petition name shall be printed in large type and below it a circle, one-half inch in diameter, and below the circle the names of the party's and petition candidates for President and Vice President in that order. On the face of the ballot above the party and petition candidate's column division the following instruction shall be printed in heavy black type:

a. To vote this ballot make a cross (X) mark in the circle below the name of the political party or petition column for whose candidates you wish to vote.

b. A vote for the names of a political party's candidates or petition candidates for President and Vice President is a vote for the electors of that party or petition candidates, the names of whom are on file with the Secretary of State.

On the bottom of the ballot shall be printed an identified facsimile of the signature of the Executive Director of the State Election Commission.

The official ballot for presidential electors shall not be combined with any other official ballots.

(D) The names of candidates offering for any other office shall be placed in the proper place on the appropriate ballot, stating whether it is a state, congressional, legislative, county or other office.

(E) The names of the several officers to be voted for and the tickets of the parties and petition candidates shall be placed on the ballots in an order as arranged by the State Election Commission as to those ballots for which it is responsible for distribution and by the commissioners of election for the respective counties as to the ballots for which they are responsible for distribution, including those for State Senator and member of the House of Representatives. If the State Senator or member of the House of Representatives or any other officer is to be elected from more than one county, the commissioners of election from the various counties from which they are to be elected shall assure that there shall be uniformity of placement on the ballots of their respective counties and should the commissioners fail to agree within sixty days prior to the general election, and upon receipt of written certification by at least one commissioner, that they have failed to act, the State Election Commission shall determine the order of placing the names on the ballots.

(F) Each county election commission must provide a copy of each ballot style to be used for primary, general, and special elections in the absentee precinct in the county to the Executive Director of the State Election Commission not later than September fifteenth in the case of general elections, and not later than forty days prior to the date of the election in the case of special and primary elections. If the ballot styles are not available by these deadlines, the executive director must determine when absentee ballots for that county will be available. If a determination is made that absentee ballots will not be available in sufficient time to adequately effectuate absentee voting, the executive director is empowered to direct the county board of voter registration to provide the blank ballots provided by Section 7-15-360 until the regular ballots are available. The executive director must also notify the chairman of the county's legislative delegation of his findings and the action taken.

SECTION 7-13-325. Use of candidate's given name, derivative thereof, or nickname on ballot.

The name of a candidate authorized by law to appear on a ballot in a general, special, or primary election in this State for any office may be one of the following or a combination of them:

(1) the candidate's given name;

(2) a derivative of the candidate's given name properly acquired under the common law and used in good faith for honest purposes; or

(3) a nickname which bears no relation to the candidate's given name but which is used in good faith for honest purposes and does not exceed fifteen letters on the ballot.

The derivative name or nickname may not imply professional or social status, an office, or military rank.

A candidate wanting to use a derivative name or a nickname, as permitted by items (2) and (3), respectively, of this section, shall notify the authority responsible by law for conducting the election, in writing, before a deadline for receiving or certifying candidates' names for inclusion on the ballot, the name he wishes to have appear and shall present evidence required by the authority conducting the election that the name indicated is his derivative name or nickname. In deciding whether the name indicated is the candidate's derivative name or nickname, the authority conducting the election shall consider appropriate criteria, including, but not limited to, the following:

(a) whether the name is the designation by which the candidate is usually and commonly known in the community in which he resides or called by other persons;

(b) whether the name is the designation by which the candidate calls himself or which he has adopted;

(c) whether the name is the designation under which the candidate transacts private and official business.

The State Election Commission may promulgate regulations to carry out the provisions of the section, including, but not limited to, forms to be completed by the candidate and the deadline by which a candidate shall indicate the name he wished to have appear on the ballot.

SECTION 7-13-330. Form of ballot; instructions.

The arrangement of general election ballots containing the names of candidates for office must conform as nearly as possible to the following plan, with a column or columns added in case of nomination by petition and a blank column added for write-in votes, and must contain the specified instructions there set forth and no other:

GENERAL ELECTION OFFICIAL BALLOT

No. ______ ____________ COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

November ___, _____

______________

Initials of Issuing Officer

OFFICIAL BALLOT

GENERAL ELECTION

__________ __________ County, South Carolina

November ___, _____

Precinct __________

INSTRUCTIONS--To vote a straight party ticket, make a cross (X) in the circle (O) under the name of your party. Nothing further need or should be done. To vote a mixed ticket, or in other words for candidates of different parties or petition candidates, omit making a cross (X) mark in the party circle at the top and make a cross (X) in the voting square opposite the name of each candidate on the ballot for whom you wish to vote. If you wish to vote for a candidate not on any ticket, write or place the name of such candidate on your ticket opposite the name of the office. Before leaving the booth, fold the ballot so that the initials of the manager may be seen on the outside of the ballot.

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Nomination by

Name of Party Name of Party Petition

Names of Office 0 0

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STATE Governor Governor Governor

Governor [ ] Name of [ ] Name of [ ] Name of

Candidate Candidate Candidate

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Lieutenant Lieut. Governor Lieut. Governor Lieut. Governor

Governor [ ] Name of [ ] Name of [ ] Name of

Candidate Candidate Candidate

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Secretary of Sec. of State Sec. of State Sec. of State

State [ ] Name of [ ] Name of [ ] Name of

Candidate Candidate Candidate

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CONGRES- U.S. Senator U.S. Senator U.S. Senator

SIONAL [ ] Name of [ ] Name of [ ] Name of

Senator Candidate Candidate Candidate

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Representative U.S. Repre- U.S. Repre- U.S. Repre-

in Congress sentative sentative sentative

[ ] Name of [ ] Name of [ ] Name of

District Candidate Candidate Candidate

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SECTION 7-13-335. Arrangement of names on certain ballots.

The State Election Commission or the local entity responsible for printing general or special election ballots or the arrangement of a ballot by mechanical or electronic means shall conform these ballots to the requirements of Section 7-13-330. The names of candidates in nonpartisan and at-large, multi-seat races must be listed in alphabetical order.

SECTION 7-13-340. Printing and distribution of ballots.

All ballots cast in general elections for national, State, county, municipal, district and circuit officers in the towns, counties, districts, circuits, cities and other political divisions shall be printed and distributed at public expense. The printing and distribution of all ballots, other than the county, State Senator, member of the House of Representatives, local or circuit ballots herein designated, the ballots for elections in cities and towns and the ballots for election on bonds or other local measures, shall be arranged and handled by the State Election Commission and shall be paid for by the State. The State Election Commission shall have all necessary ballots for elections for presidential electors, State officers, United States Senators and members of Congress printed, and shall deliver such ballots to the various county commissioners of election at least ten days prior to the date of the election and the county commissioners of election shall place such ballots in ballot boxes for distribution to the election managers of the various precincts.

The printing and distribution of ballots in all State Senate, member of the House of Representatives, county, local and circuit elections shall be arranged and handled by the commissioners of election of the several counties and shall be paid for by the respective counties, and the commissioners of election shall place such ballots in ballot boxes for distribution to the election managers of the various precincts. The printing and distribution of ballots in all municipal elections shall be arranged and handled by the municipal authorities conducting such elections and shall be paid for by the municipalities.

The terms "municipal" and "municipalities" as used in this section shall be construed to include school districts, public service districts and like political subdivisions.

SECTION 7-13-350. Certification of candidates; verification of qualifications.

(A) Except as otherwise provided in this section, the nominees in a party primary or party convention held under the provisions of this title by any political party certified by the commission for one or more of the offices, national, state, circuit, multi-county district, countywide, less than countywide, or municipal to be voted on in the general election, held on the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November, must be placed upon the appropriate ballot for the election as candidates nominated by the party by the authority charged by law with preparing the ballot if the names of the nominees are certified, in writing, by the political party chairman, vice-chairman, or secretary to the authority, for general elections held under Section 7-13-10, not later than twelve o'clock noon on August fifteenth or, if August fifteenth falls on Saturday or Sunday, not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday; and for a special or municipal general election, by at least twelve o'clock noon on the sixtieth day prior to the date of holding the election, or if the sixtieth day falls on Sunday, by twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday. Political parties nominating candidates by primary or convention must verify the qualifications of those candidates prior to certification to the authority charged by law with preparing the ballot. The written certification required by this section must contain a statement that each candidate certified meets, or will meet by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, the qualifications for the office for which he has filed. Any candidate who does not, or will not by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, meet the qualifications for the office for which he has filed shall not be nominated and certified, and such candidate's name shall not be placed on a general, special, or municipal election ballot.

(B) Candidates for President and Vice President must be certified not later than twelve o'clock noon on August thirtieth to the State Election Commission, or if August thirtieth falls on Sunday, not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday.

SECTION 7-13-351. Nominees by petition.

Any nominee by petition for one or more of the national, state, circuit, multi-county district, countywide, or less than countywide offices, to be voted on in the general election must be placed upon the appropriate ballot by the officer, commissioners, or other authority charged by law with preparing the ballot if the petition is submitted to the officer, commissioner, or other authority, as the case may be, for general elections held under Section 7-13-10, not later than twelve o'clock noon on July fifteenth or, if July fifteenth falls on Saturday or Sunday, not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday. At the time the petition is submitted, the authority charged with accepting it shall issue a receipt to the person submitting the petition which must reflect the date it was submitted and the total number of signatures contained in the petition. The board of voter registration of each respective county must check the petition at the request of the authority charged with printing the ballot for that office and must certify the results to the authority not later than twelve o'clock noon August fifteenth or, if August fifteenth falls on Sunday, not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday.

The petition of any candidate in any special election, including municipal special elections, must be submitted to the authority charged with printing the ballot for those offices not later than twelve o'clock noon on the sixtieth day prior to the date of the holding of the election, or if the sixtieth day falls on Sunday, by not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday. At the time a petition is submitted, the authority charged with accepting it must issue a receipt to the person submitting the petition which must reflect the date the petition was submitted and the total number of signatures contained in the petition. The candidate submitting the petition must certify, on a form designed and provided by the State Election Commission, that he meets, or will meet by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, the qualifications for the office sought. The board of voter registration of each respective county must check the petition at the request of the authority charged with printing of the ballots for that office and must certify the results thereof to the authority not later than twelve o'clock noon on the forty-fifth day prior to the date of holding the election, or if the forty-fifth day falls on Sunday, by twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday.

Once submitted for verification, a petition for nomination of a candidate for any office may not be returned to the petitioner, but must be retained by the authority to whom the petition was submitted and must become a part of the records of the election for which the petition was submitted.

In the event of an emergency declared by the Governor and the conditions precipitating the emergency declaration prevent a candidate from filing the nominating petition within the time required by this section, the candidate has an additional five days to submit the nominating petition to the appropriate office.

The authority to whom a petition is submitted must verify that qualifications of each potential petition candidate prior to certification of that candidate to be placed on the ballot. The written certification required by this section must contain a statement that each candidate certified meets, or will meet by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, the qualifications for the office for which the petition is submitted. Any candidate who does not, or will not by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, meet the qualifications for the office sought shall not have his name placed on the ballot.

SECTION 7-13-352. Date by which statement of candidacy must be filed; verification of candidates' qualifications.

Any candidate for a nonpartisan office, multi-county district, countywide, or less than countywide, including municipal offices, to be voted on at the time of the general election, who qualifies by statement of candidacy shall file the statement of candidacy with the authority responsible by law for conducting the election not later than twelve o'clock noon on August fifteenth or, if August fifteenth falls on Saturday or Sunday, not later than twelve o'clock noon on the following Monday. Each candidate must affirm, in writing, that he meets, or will meet by the time of the election, or as otherwise required by law, the qualifications for the office sought. The authority with whom statements of candidacy are filed must verify that each candidate meets, or will meet by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, the qualifications for the office sought. Any candidate who does not, or will not by the time of the general election, or as otherwise required by law, meet the qualifications for the office sought shall not have his name placed on the ballot.

SECTION 7-13-355. Time for submitting question to election commission for submission as referendum to electors.

No question may be submitted to the qualified electors in a referendum held at the time of a general election unless the question is submitted to the appropriate election commission to be placed on the ballot no later than 12:00 noon on August fifteenth or, if August fifteenth falls on Saturday or Sunday, not later than 12:00 noon on the following business day.

SECTION 7-13-360. Place on ballot for write-in names.

The ballots shall also contain a place for voters to write in the name of any other person for whom they wish to vote except on ballots for the election of the President and Vice President.

SECTION 7-13-370. Death, withdrawal or disqualification of candidate after name printed on ballot.

If any candidate dies, withdraws or otherwise becomes disqualified after his name has been printed on an official election ballot and if any person is nominated, as authorized by law, to fill such vacancy, the name of the candidate so nominated to fill such vacancy need not be printed upon the ballots, but the name of such candidate so nominated shall be certified by the party executive committee making the nomination to the officer, commissioners or other authority charged with the duty of printing such ballots and a vote cast by a voter for the name of the candidate printed on the ballot who has either died, withdrawn or otherwise become disqualified shall be counted as a vote for the candidate subsequently nominated to fill such vacancy whose name is on file with such officer, commissioners, or other authority.

SECTION 7-13-380. Reprinting ballots to delete name of deceased or withdrawn candidate is optional.

After the official ballots have been printed by the proper officer, commissioners, or other authority, the death or withdrawal of a candidate whose name is printed on the official ballot does not require the officer, commissioners, or other authority to reprint the official ballots, but the officer, commissioners, or other authority having jurisdiction over the printing and distribution of the ballots concerned may (1) cause the ballots to be reprinted and be substituted in all respects for the first printed ballots if this substitution is considered feasible and advisable or (2) affix a blank label to cover the name of the deceased or withdrawn candidate on voting systems where possible or appropriate.

SECTION 7-13-390. Limitations on withdrawal of candidacy.

After the proper officer, commissioners or other authority has been notified of the nomination, as hereinbefore specified, of any candidate for office, he shall not withdraw such nomination unless upon the written request of the candidate so nominated made at least thirty days before the day of election.

SECTION 7-13-400. Form of ballot when questions are submitted.

The form of ballot in an election on the issuance of bonds or in which any other question or issue is submitted to a vote of the people shall be a statement of the question or questions and shall thereafter have the following words:

In favor of the question or issue (as the case may be)

Opposed to the question or issue (as the case may be)

The voter shall be instructed in substance, if he wishes to vote in favor of the proposition to place a check or cross mark in the square after the words first above written and if he wishes to vote against the proposition to place a check or cross mark in the square after the words second above written.

Nothing herein shall be construed to prevent any party from submitting to party members any question or issue.

SECTION 7-13-410. Ballots where both state-wide and local constitutional amendments are submitted.

Whenever at any general election proposed amendments to the Constitution of both state-wide and local natures are submitted to the qualified electors of the State, the State officer charged with the duty of preparing the ballots shall arrange and classify the proposed amendments on such ballots as follows:

At the top of one ballot shall be printed the words "Statewide Constitutional Amendments." Under this heading there shall be placed the various proposed amendments of a state-wide nature. At the top of a separate ballot shall be printed the words "Local Constitutional Amendments." Under this heading there shall be printed in alphabetical order the names of the various counties of the State affected by any proposed local amendments and under the name of each county the particular amendment affecting such county, or any particular subdivision thereof, or municipality situated therein, but when any proposed amendment relates to two or more counties such proposed amendment shall be listed under a joint heading combined of the names of such counties. The heading shall be printed in larger type than that used in printing the proposed amendment.

Ballots for the state-wide constitutional amendments shall be printed on white paper and ballots for the local constitutional amendments shall be printed on a paper other than white.

SECTION 7-13-420. Oath of printer of ballots and assistants.

The printer with whom the executive director, commissioners of election or other authority, as the case may be, shall contract for the printing of official ballots shall, before the work is commenced, take an oath before the Executive Director of the State Election Commission or the chairman of the commissioners or other authority, as the case may be, who may administer such oath, to the following effect: "I, __________, do solemnly swear that I will print (here insert number) ballots according to the instructions of the __________ of __________; that I will not print or permit to be printed, directly or indirectly, more than the above number; that I will at once destroy all imperfect and perfect impressions other than those required to be delivered to the electoral board; that as soon as said number of ballots is printed I will distribute the type used for such work and that I will not communicate to anyone whomsoever, in any manner whatsoever, the size, style or contents of such ballots."

The above oath shall be reduced to writing and signed by the person taking it and also a similar affidavit shall be required of any employee or other person engaged upon the work or who shall have access to it. Any intentional violation of such oath shall constitute the crime of perjury. Any other violation of the provisions of this section shall be a misdemeanor and punished by a fine of one hundred dollars or imprisonment for thirty days in jail.

Nothing herein contained shall be construed to prohibit the executive director, the commissioners or other authority from publishing or otherwise disclosing the contents, style and size of ballots required to be printed by them which they are respectively authorized and empowered to publish or otherwise disclose.

SECTION 7-13-430. Ballots provided where voting machines not used; substitute ballots; penalties for failure to provide; failsafe ballots.

(A) There must be provided for each voting place where voting machines are not used as many ballots as are equal to one hundred ten percent of the registered qualified voters at the voting place. There must be provided for each voting place where voting machines are used a number of ballots not to exceed ten percent of the registered qualified voters at the voting place. The authority responsible for conducting an election must provide to each poll manager the appropriate number of ballots according to the provisions of this section.

(B) When a sufficient number of official ballots are not available for all qualified electors present at the polling place to vote, the managers of election without undue delay shall provide ballots made as nearly as possible in the form of the official ballot to those electors for whom official ballots are unavailable, and for all purposes of the election laws of this State these ballots are the same as official ballots. A manager of election who fails to comply with the provisions of this subsection is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction, must be fined not more than five hundred dollars.

(C) There must be provided for each voting place a number of failsafe ballots, or ballots containing only the races for federal, statewide, countywide, and municipalwide offices, not to exceed five percent of the registered qualified voters at the voting place. The authority responsible for conducting an election must provide to each poll manager the appropriate number of ballots according to the provisions of this section.

SECTION 7-13-440. Voting machine ballots; arrangement of nominations.

In every county, city or town providing voting machines, the commissioners of election shall furnish to the managers of election a sufficient number of ballots printed on clear white paper, of such form and size as will fit the ballot frames of the machines, the arrangement of the names of the candidates on such ballots to be prescribed by the commissioners of election. Party nominations shall be arranged on each voting machine either in columns or horizontal rows, as shall nominations by petition, and the captions of the various ballots on such machines shall be so placed as to indicate to the voter what push knob, key lever or other device is to be used or operated in order to vote for the candidate or candidates of his choice.

SECTION 7-13-450. Use of voting machines shall not prohibit use of separate ballots on certain questions.

The use of voting machines in an election shall not prohibit the use of a separate ballot for constitutional amendments and other public measures.

SECTION 7-13-460. Use of paper ballots.

(A) In special elections to fill vacancies in office, if the use of voting machines is not practicable or cost efficient, the county election officials may use paper ballots in these elections.

(B) If paper ballots are used, the procedure for their use and the counting of these ballots must be in accordance with the provisions of law governing the use of paper ballots, mutatis mutandis.

ARTICLE 5.

BALLOTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTIONS

SECTION 7-13-610. Ballot specifications; separate ballots for each party.

(A) The State Election Commission and the respective county election commissions shall prepare separate ballots for each political party holding a primary. The ballots for each party must contain in print only the names of the candidates who have filed to run in that particular party primary and must have a stub at the top perforated so as to be easily detached. On the stub must be printed "Official state (or county) Ballot, (name of party) Primary", the name of the county and the precinct, and the date of the primary. On the right side there must be a blank line under which must be printed "Initials of Issuing Officer". Stubs on ballots for each precinct must be numbered consecutively, beginning with "No. 1". The ballots must be furnished by the State Election Commission for all except members of the General Assembly, county officers, less than county officers, and circuit solicitors, for which the county election commission shall furnish the ballots. One ballot must contain the names of all persons in alphabetical order running for state and federal offices. The other ballot must contain, in alphabetical order, the names of all persons running for the General Assembly, county offices, less than county officers, and solicitors.

(B) Ballots furnished by the State Election Commission under this section must have marked on them in plain type, both on the stub and on the ballot, the words "Official State Ballot". Ballots furnished by the county election commission under this section must have marked on them in plain type, both on the stub and on the ballot, the words "Official County Ballot".

(C) The ballot must be printed on paper of a thickness so that the printing cannot be distinguished from the back and must be of a size and color as directed by the State Election Commission. If more than one ballot is to be used in a primary, each ballot must be printed on different colored paper. The ballot must contain a voting square opposite the name of each candidate, and the voter shall vote by putting a mark in the voting square opposite the name of the candidate of his choice. The State Election Commission may establish, under Chapter 23 of Title 1, such rules and regulations as are necessary for the proper administration of this section.

SECTION 7-13-611. Arrangement of official county and state primary ballots.

The arrangement of each "Official County Ballot" for each primary, containing the names of candidates for office, must conform as nearly as practicable to the following plan and contain specified instructions and no others:

OFFICIAL COUNTY BALLOT, ____________________ PRIMARY

(NAME OF PARTY)



__________________ COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA



NO: ______ _____________ _____________

Initials of Issuing Officer



__________________________, 19______

(DATE OF ELECTION)



__________________________

(NAME OF PRECINCT)



OFFICIAL COUNTY BALLOT, ____________________ PRIMARY

(NAME OF PARTY)



__________________ COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA



__________________________, 19______

(DATE OF ELECTION)



__________________________

(NAME OF PRECINCT)

INSTRUCTIONS -

Make a cross (X) in the voting square [ ] opposite the name of

each candidate on the ballot for whom you wish to vote.

Before leaving the booth, fold the ballot so that the

initials of the manager may be seen on the outside.

_______________________________________________________________________________

You may vote for one, less than one, but not more than one candidate.



_______________________________________________________________________________

SHERIFF ONE SEAT TO FILL

(Example)

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------



You may vote for three, less than three, but not more than three candidates.

COUNTY COUNCIL THREE SEATS TO FILL

(Example)

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

[ ] (NAME OF CANDIDATE)

-------------------

Each "Official State Ballot" similarly must conform to the plan set forth in this section.

The State Election Commission is hereby empowered to promulgate such rules and regulations under Chapter 23 of Title 1 as are necessary for the arrangement of the official county ballot.

SECTION 7-13-620. Repealed by 2000 Act No. 392 Section 11, eff August 1, 2000.

ARTICLE 7.

VOTING PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL ELECTIONS

SECTION 7-13-710. Proof of right to vote; signing poll list; comparison of signatures.



When any person presents himself to vote, he shall produce his valid South Carolina driver's license or other form of identification containing a photograph issued by the Department of Public Safety, if he is not licensed to drive, or the written notification of registration provided for by Sections 7-5-125 and 7-5-180 if the notification has been signed by the elector. If the elector loses or defaces his registration notification, he may obtain a duplicate notification from his county board of registration upon request in person, or by telephone or mail. After presentation of the required identification, his name must be checked by one of the managers on the margin of the page opposite his name upon the registration books, or copy of the books, furnished by the board of registration. The managers shall keep a poll list which must contain one column headed "Names of Voters". Before any ballot is delivered to a voter, the voter shall sign his name on the poll list, which must be furnished to the appropriate election officials by the State Election Commission. At the top of each page the voter's oath appropriate to the election must be printed. The signing of the poll list or the marking of the poll list is considered to be an affirmation of the oath by the voter. One of the managers shall compare the signature on the poll list with the signature on the voter's driver's license, registration notification, or other identification and may require further identification of the voter and proof of his right to vote under this title as he considers necessary. If the voter is unable to write or if the voter is prevented from signing by physical handicap, he may sign his name to the poll list by mark with the assistance of one of the managers.

SECTION 7-13-720. Oath of voter.

In the event the oath is not printed at the top of the poll list as provided for in Section 7-13-710, the managers of election shall administer to each person offering to vote an oath that he is qualified to vote at this election, according to the laws and Constitution of this State, and that he has not voted during this election.

SECTION 7-13-730. Delivery and marking of ballot; deposit into ballot box.

If the managers are reasonably sure that the person is entitled to vote, they shall then deliver a ballot to such person, and thereupon the voter shall immediately go to the booth and mark his ballot preparatory to depositing it in the ballot box. After the voter has marked his ballot, he shall fold it so as to leave the stub remaining attached thereto visible in such position that it can be detached without unfolding. When the ballot is returned, one of the managers shall detach and retain the stub, and the voter shall then deposit his folded ballot in the box.

SECTION 7-13-740. Number and construction of booths; only one voter in booth at a time; speaking to voter prohibited.

There must be provided at each polling precinct at least one booth. At least one booth must be provided for each two hundred and fifty registered electors or a major fraction thereof of the precinct. The booths must be made of wood, sheet metal, or other suitable substance; must not be less than thirty-two inches wide, thirty-two inches deep, and six feet six inches high; must have a curtain hanging from the top in front to within three feet of the floor; and must have a suitable shelf on which the voter can prepare his ballot. In primary, general, and special elections, the booths must be provided by the commissioners of election or other electoral board. Only one voter shall be allowed to enter a booth at a time, and no one except as provided herein is allowed to speak to a voter while in the booth preparing his ballot.

SECTION 7-13-750. Repealed by 1984 Act No. 315 Section 1, eff April 2, 1984.

SECTION 7-13-760. Time when voter must leave booth and voting place; voter must be alone in booth and must not talk while voting.

No voter, while receiving, preparing and casting his ballot, shall occupy a booth or compartment for a longer time than five minutes. No voter shall be allowed to occupy a booth or compartment already occupied by another, nor to speak or converse with anyone, except as herein provided, while in the booth. After having voted, or declined or failed to vote within five minutes, the voter shall immediately withdraw from the voting place and shall not enter the polling place again during the election.

SECTION 7-13-770. Unauthorized persons not allowed within guard rail; voter may obtain assistance.

No person other than a voter preparing his ballot is allowed within the guard rail, except as provided in this section. A voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write shall make the fact known to the managers. The chairman of the managers shall appoint one of the managers and any person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer or agent of that employer or officer or agent of the voter's union to assist the voter in preparing his ballot. After the voter's ballot has been prepared, the person chosen by the voter to assist him shall immediately leave the vicinity of the guard rail. In lieu of the above assistance a person may have a member of his family or, in the case of a blind voter, any person of his choosing render him assistance in voting without the presence of a manager. The term "family" means spouse, father, mother, son, daughter, brother, sister, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, granddaughter, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew.

SECTION 7-13-771. Voting by handicapped and elderly electors who cannot enter the polling place or cannot stand in line to vote.

(A) Any elector who, because of physical handicap or age, cannot enter the polling place in the precinct in which he is registered to vote, or is unable to stand in line to vote, may vote outside that polling place in the closest available parking area utilizing the vehicle in which he has been driven, or has driven to the polls.

(B) When the managers are informed that a handicapped or elderly voter cannot enter the polling place or cannot stand in line to vote, the voter's identification required by Section 7-13-710 must be presented to the managers who must verify that the voter is eligible to vote. Upon verification of the voter's eligibility, two managers shall take the poll list and the voter's ballot to the voter in his vehicle outside the polling place. The managers shall notify any poll watchers present who, at their discretion, may accompany the managers as observers. Where the polling place uses machines for the purposes of voting, the poll managers must use the ballots provided under Sections 7-13-1470 or 7-13-1870 for those voters who cannot enter the polling place.

(C) No person other than the voter is permitted in the vehicle in which the voter is casting his ballot unless the voter is entitled to assistance as provided in Section 7-13-770.

(D) After the voter has voted his ballot, he must fold it so that the secrecy of the ballot is preserved and return it to the managers waiting outside the vehicle. The managers shall carry the ballot to the ballot box, taking care not to violate the secrecy of the ballot, and after detaching the stub, deposit the ballot in the ballot box.

SECTION 7-13-780. Designation of voters who may receive assistance.

Only those persons who are unable to read or write or who are physically unable or incapacitated from preparing a ballot or voting shall be entitled to receive assistance of any kind in voting.

SECTION 7-13-790. Substitute for marred or defaced ballot.

If a voter shall mar or deface his ballot, he may obtain one additional ballot upon returning to the managers in charge of the ballots the ballot so marred or defaced with the stub attached. The manager in charge of the poll list shall change the number of the ballot on the poll list and place the marred or defaced ballot in a file. No voter shall be given a second ballot until he has returned the first one with the stub attached.

SECTION 7-13-800. Write-ins shall be in handwriting of voter or authorized manager.

In casting a write-in ballot, the voter shall cast it in his own handwriting or in the handwriting of a duly authorized manager who is aiding the voter in casting his ballot when assistance is authorized by this Title.

Nothing contained in this section shall be construed to prevent the use of electronic methods of casting write-in ballots or the use of voting machines which do not employ paper and handwriting methods or technology for casting write-in ballots.

SECTION 7-13-810. Prevention of illegal voting or taking too much time; challenging voters.

The managers of election shall prevent any person from voting when they have good reason to believe the person has already voted. They shall refuse to allow a person to vote who is not a registered elector or who has become disqualified for any cause to vote in the voting precinct. They may also prevent any voter from consuming more than five minutes in voting, but no manager may examine, read, or handle the ballot being voted or about to be voted by a voter or interfere in any way with the voting of a voter otherwise than provided in this section. It is the duty of the managers of election to, and any elector or qualified watcher may, challenge the vote of a person who may be known or suspected not to be a qualified voter. However, the challenges by persons other than a manager must be addressed to the manager and not directly to the voter. The manager shall then present the challenge to the voter and act in accordance with the provisions provided for in this section. All challenges must be made before the time a voter deposits a paper ballot in a ballot box or casts his vote in a voting machine, and no challenge may be considered after that time. However, challenges may be made at any time before the opening of return-addressed envelopes and the removal of "Ballot Herein" envelopes from them as to absentee voters. Nothing contained from them affects the right of an elector or qualified watcher to challenge the vote of a person which is fraudulent or when the challenge is based on evidence discovered after the vote is cast. A candidate may protest an election in which he is a candidate pursuant to Section 7-17-30 when the protest is based in whole or in part on evidence discovered after the election. This evidence may include, but is not limited to, after-discovered evidence of voters who have voted in a precinct or for a district office other than the one in which they are entitled by law to vote.

SECTION 7-13-820. Voting by person whose name is not on registration book.

When any person presents himself with a valid South Carolina driver's license or other form of identification required by Section 7-13-710, if he is not licensed to drive, at the polling precinct and his name does not appear on the registration book a manager must call the county registration office from any phone available at or away from the polling precinct. The manager shall give only the name of the elector as it appears on the driver's license or other form of identification. The member of the registration board taking the call must check the records of the board and if the name of the person is found and he is eligible to vote in the precinct the date of birth of the person must be read to the manager who must then ask the person for such date. Upon answering correctly, the person may vote. When a manager is to make a call for such purpose, he must notify the poll watchers who may accompany the manager and have the information repeated to each of them. The manager must fill in the information on the driver's license or other form of identification on a form provided for that purpose before permitting such person to vote. In the event such call is a toll call it may be made collect and the registration office must accept the call.

If the name cannot be verified by the registration board, or if a phone is not available, the poll manager or his designee may permit the person to vote after following the procedures set forth in Section 7-13-830, and the vote must be processed as a provisional vote. The poll manager must be listed as the challenger.

The provisions of this section are in addition to the procedure provided in Section 7-5-440.

SECTION 7-13-830. Procedure when voter challenged.

When any person is so challenged, the manager must explain to him the qualifications of an elector and may examine his as to the same. If the person insists that he is qualified and the challenge is not withdrawn, his provisional vote must be received and placed in an envelope on which must be written the name of the voter and that of the challenger. The provisional votes must be kept separate and apart and not counted but turned over to the commissioners of election or other authority having supervision of the election. At the meeting specified in either Section 7-17-10 or 7-17-510, whichever is applicable, this authority must hear all objections to these votes, and when no person appears or offers evidence before the meeting to sustain an objection made at the polls, the ballot is no longer a provisional ballot. When the challenger appears or produces witnesses or evidence in support of the challenge, the authority in charge must proceed to hear and determine the question. Its decision is final. Each provisional ballot which is no longer challenged and each ballot whose challenge was decided in favor of the voter must be removed from the envelope, mingled, and counted and the totals added to the previously counted regular ballot total of all precincts without attribution to a particular precinct. If the voting at the voting place is being done upon a voting machine, the managers must provide a paper ballot which must be placed in an envelope and treated as provided in this section.

Where, pursuant to Section 7-13-820, a person's name could not be verified by the registration board or where a telephone was not available and the person was allowed to vote a provisional ballot, the Board of Voter Registration, before the meeting, must certify to the authority in charge whether or not the voter is a qualified elector of the precinct in which he voted his provisional ballot. If the board certifies the person challenged is not a qualified elector of the precinct, this certification is considered an administrative challenge and is clear and convincing evidence for the meeting authority to disallow the ballot. Nothing in this section prohibits the county election commission from continuing any challenge administratively as long as it has evidence to sustain the challenge.

SECTION 7-13-840. Ballot boxes; number, location, construction, color, labeling.

There shall be provided for each voting place a sufficient number of boxes to meet the anticipated requirements. In general and special elections they shall be provided by the commissioners of election or other electoral board; in primaries by the county committee. There shall always be provided at least one box for each kind of ballot used. An opening shall be made in the lid of each box not larger than sufficient for a single ballot to be inserted therein at one time, through which the ballot shall be inserted by the person voting and by no other. Each box shall be provided with a sufficient lock and shall be publicly opened and inspected, to show that it is empty and secure, and locked just before the opening of the poll. The keys shall be returned to the managers and the box shall not be opened during the election. Each box shall be labeled in plain and distinct roman letters with the office or officers voted for and shall be painted in a color corresponding to the proper ballot to be placed therein, or have sample ballots conspicuously affixed to the box in which like ballots are to be deposited, and the managers, on the demand of the voter, shall be required to read to him the names of the boxes. The ballot boxes shall be so located as to be in view of the persons outside of the rail at the polling place during the time of the voting.

SECTION 7-13-850. Closing polls; voters waiting may vote.

At the time for closing the polls the chairman of the managers shall announce that the polls are closed, but any voters who are in the process of voting or are present waiting to vote shall be allowed to vote before the polls close.

SECTION 7-13-860. Watchers; appointment, qualifications, identification, and conduct.

Each candidate who is not unopposed in a primary and each nonpartisan candidate, including announced write-in candidates in a general or special election, may appoint a watcher for any voting place where his name appears on the ballot. However, in any general or special election, all candidates who are certified by a political party must be jointly represented at each polling place by not more than two watchers from the party for each one thousand registered voters or fraction thereof registered at the polling place. Each watcher appointed hereunder must be a qualified voter in the county where he is to watch, and must be certified, in writing, to the managers of the voting precinct to which assigned. This certification must be signed by the primary or nonpartisan candidate or, in the case of watchers jointly representing all candidates of a political party, by an appropriate party official. Watchers must, at all times, wear visible identification specifying the candidate or party, as appropriate, which they represent. The identification badge of a poll watcher may not exceed four and one-fourth inches by four and one-fourth inches with individual letters on the badge not exceeding one-quarter inch in height or width. Badges may not be a color that has a fluorescent quality. After qualification, watchers must be placed in an area designated by the poll managers where the watchers can observe the entire election process at that polling place. No watcher may conduct himself in a manner that will interfere in the orderly conduct of the election or influence any voter in the casting of his ballot.

ARTICLE 9.

VOTING PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO PRIMARY ELECTIONS ONLY

SECTION 7-13-1010. Additional oath of voters.

The managers at each box shall require every voter to take the following additional oath and pledge: "I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am duly qualified to vote at this primary election and that I have not voted before at this primary election or in any other party's primary election or officially participated in the nominating convention for any vacancy for which this primary is being held."

SECTION 7-13-1020. Absentee voting not permitted in primaries; exceptions.

Absentee enrollment and absentee voting may not be provided for by party rules or permitted in any primary election, except as provided in Section 7-13-1030 or in Chapter 15 of this Title.

SECTION 7-13-1030. Voting by National Guard when on duty.

In case the National Guard of South Carolina is called to active duty, is mobilized or is participated in field training, the State committee shall provide for the voting of all members of the National Guard qualified to vote, whether such members are within the State or elsewhere.

SECTION 7-13-1040. No person to vote in more than one primary on same day.

No person shall be entitled to vote in more than one party primary election held the same day.

ARTICLE 11.

CANVASSING AND COUNTING OF BALLOTS

SECTION 7-13-1110. Counting ballots and declaration of result; volunteer personnel may assist.

At the close of the election the managers and clerk shall immediately proceed publicly to open the ballot boxes and count the ballots therein and shall continue such count, without adjournment or interruption, until it is completed. They shall then make and sign such statement of the result thereof as the nature of the election shall require. At the completion of the vote counting a duplicate of the statement and return of votes must be published by posting it in a conspicuous site at the polling places, except in counties where vote recorders are used for voting.

Managers of election are authorized to use additional volunteer personnel in counting the ballots. None of such personnel shall be a candidate or watcher for a candidate for an office voted on in the election and shall be required to take the following oath prior to assuming their duties: "I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am not a candidate or watcher in this election, am a qualified elector of this county, that I will count the ballots entrusted to my care in a fair and impartial manner, and make to the best of my ability a correct tabulation of the results." The managers shall be required to make a list of all such counters and turn such list in with other election material. The provisions of this section shall not apply to the counting of ballots at any precinct using vote recorders which require the ballot cards to be counted with the use of a tabulating machine.

SECTION 7-13-1120. Disposition of improperly marked ballots.

If a voter marks more names than there are persons to be elected or nominated to an office or if for any reason it is impossible to determine the voter's choice for any office to be filled, his ballot shall not be counted for such office; but this shall not vitiate the ballot, so far as properly marked. Nothing herein shall be construed to prevent any voter in a general or special election from voting for any qualified person, other than those whose names are printed on the ballot, by writing in the name of the person opposite the office.

SECTION 7-13-1130. Disposition of ballots found in wrong box and ballots folded together.

If ballots shall be found on opening the box, upon which shall appear the name of an office or the name of a person in connection with an office other than that for which the box in which such ballot is found shall be designated and labeled, these ballots shall be counted, if in counting the ballots for that office the number of ballots does not exceed the number of names on the poll list. If the number of names on the poll list is exceeded by counting all of the ballots, then none of the ballots for that office found in the incorrect box shall be counted. If, in counting, two or more like ballots shall be found folded together compactly, one shall be counted. The other shall be destroyed. But if they bear different names, all shall be destroyed and none counted.

SECTION 7-13-1140. Procedure when too many ballots found in box or too many votes tabulated.

If more ballots shall be found on opening the box or if more ballots, which are tabulated by vote recorder equipment, or if the number of votes tabulated on voting machines in any polling place exceeds the number of voters listed on the poll list at such polling place, the vote total for each candidate or issue shall be reduced by that fraction of the excess vote cast that his total vote bears to the total number of votes cast in the polling place. Fractional parts of single votes shall be disregarded.

If the number of votes cast by any type ballot or on machines in any polling place exceeds the number listed on the polling list by ten percent or more, the county executive committee or the county election commission, as the case may be, shall order a new primary or election at the polling place concerned if the outcome of the election could be affected. Only those who signed the poll list shall be permitted to vote in any such new primary or election.

SECTION 7-13-1150. Accounting for ballots after election; returns; delivery of poll lists and other matters; unused ballots.

When the canvassing and counting of the votes are completed, the chairman of the managers, or one of them to be designated in writing by the managers, shall deliver to the commissioners of election the poll list, the boxes containing the ballots and a written return of the result of the election in the voting precinct. Managers shall account to the commissioners of election of the county for all ballots delivered to them and make the following returns, (a) the number of official ballots furnished to each voting precinct, (b) the number of official ballots spoiled and returned by voters, (c) the number of official ballots returned to the commissioners of election and (d) the number of official ballots actually voted.

The commissioners of election shall keep in possession all unused ballots, as well as those that have been spoiled, until the time for contesting the election has expired. Any ballot that has been lost must be accounted for by a certificate from the chairman of the managers of the particular precinct covering the circumstances.

SECTION 7-13-1160. Reporting of election results to State Election Commission.

Within twenty-four hours of the completion of the canvassing and counting of ballots, the persons in charge of each such election in each county shall notify the State Election Commission of the unofficial results of such election in each such county; provided, however, that failure to comply with the provisions of this section shall not invalidate the votes cast therein.

SECTION 7-13-1170. Ordering of new election by Governor.

When any election official of any political subdivision of this State charged with ordering, providing for, or holding an election has neglected, failed, or refused to order, provide for, or hold the election at the time appointed, or if for any reason the election is declared void by competent authority, and these facts are made to appear to the satisfaction of the Governor, he shall, should the law not otherwise provide for this contingency, order an election or a new election to be held at the time and place, and upon the notice being given which to him appears adequate to insure the will of the electorate being fairly expressed. To that end, he may designate the existing election official or other person as he may appoint to perform the necessary official duties pertaining to the election and to declare the result.

ARTICLE 13.

VOTE RECORDERS

SECTION 7-13-1310. Authority of counties to procure and authorize use of vote recorders.

The governing body of any county, subject to the written approval of a majority of the county legislative delegation, including a majority of the Senators, may at any regular meeting, or at a special meeting called for the purpose, authorize the use of vote recorders for recording and computing the vote at elections held in the county upon such terms and conditions as the governing body may prescribe. The governing body shall purchase or otherwise procure vote recorders conforming to the requirements of this article.

SECTION 7-13-1320. Use of vote recorders in certain precincts; use of vote recorders of different kinds; number and capacity of vote recorders.

(a) The use of vote recorders may be authorized for use in some precincts in a county without requiring their use in all precincts.

(b) Vote recorders of different kinds may be used for different precincts in the same county.

(c) The county election commission shall provide vote recorders in such numbers as it deems necessary in good working order and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the names of all candidates for all party offices and nominations and public offices which, under the provisions of existing laws and party rules, are to be voted for at any primary or other election.

SECTION 7-13-1330. Vote recorders and optical scan voting systems; approval process; duration and changes.

(A) Before any kind of vote recorder system, including an optical scan voting system, is used at any election, it shall be approved by the State Election Commission which shall examine the vote recorder and shall make and file in the commission's office a report, attested by the signature of the executive director, stating whether, in the opinion of the commission, the kind of vote recorder so examined can be accurately and efficiently used by electors at elections, as provided by law. No vote recorder or optical scan voting system may be approved for use in the State unless certified by an Independent Testing Authority (ITA) accredited by the National Association of State Election Directors and the State Election Commission as meeting or exceeding the minimum requirements of the Federal Election Commission's national voting system standards. If this report states that the vote recorder can be so used, the recorder shall be considered approved and vote recorders of its kind may be adopted for use at elections, as herein provided.

(B) No kind of vote recorder not approved pursuant to this section shall be used at any election and if, upon the reexamination of any type vote recorder previously approved, it appears that the vote recorder so reexamined can no longer be accurately and efficiently used by electors at elections as provided by law, the approval of the vote recorder must immediately be revoked by the State Election Commission, and no such type vote recorder shall thereafter be purchased for use or used in this State.

(C) If a vote recorder, including an optical scan voting system, which was approved for use before July 1, 1999, is improved or otherwise changed in a way since its approval that does not impair its accuracy, efficiency, or capacity, the vote recorder may be used in elections. However, if the software, hardware, or firmware of the system is improved or otherwise changed, the system must comply with the requirements of subsection (A).

(D) Any person or company who requests an examination of any type of vote recorder or optical scan voting system shall pay a nonrefundable examination fee of one thousand dollars for a new voting system and a nonrefundable examination fee of five hundred dollars for an upgrade to any existing system to the State Election Commission. The State Election Commission may at any time, in its discretion, reexamine any vote recorder or optical scan voting system when evidence is presented to the commission that the accuracy or the ability of the system to be used satisfactorily in the conduct of elections is in question.

(E) Any person or company who seeks approval for any vote recorder or optical scan voting system in this State must file with the State Election Commission a list of all states or jurisdictions in which the system has been approved for use. This list must state how long the system has been used in the state; contain the name, address, and telephone number of that state or jurisdiction's chief election official; and must disclose any reports compiled by state or local government concerning the performance of the system. The vendor is responsible for filing this information on an ongoing basis.

(F) Any person or company who seeks approval for any vote recorder or optical scan voting system must file with the State Election Commission copies of all contracts and maintenance agreements used in connection with the sale of the voting system. All changes to standard contracts and maintenance agreements must be filed with the State Election Commission.

(G) Any person or company who seeks approval for any vote recorder or optical scan voting system must conduct, under the supervision of the State Election Commission and any county election commission, a field test for any new voting system, as part of the certification process. The field test shall involve South Carolina voters and election officials and must be conducted as part of a scheduled primary, general, or special election. This test must be held in two or more precincts, and all costs relating to the voting system must be borne by the vendor. The test must be designed to gauge voter reaction to the system, problems that voters have with the system, and the number of voting units required for the efficient operation of an election. The test must also demonstrate the accuracy of votes cast and reported on the system.

(H) Before any vote recorder or optical scan voting system approved after July 1, 1999, may be used in elections in the State, all source codes for the system must be placed in escrow by the manufacturer, at the manufacturer's expense, with the approved software ITA. These source codes must be available to the State Election Commission in the event that the company goes out of business, pursuant to court order, or in the event that the State Election Commission determines that an examination of these source codes is necessary. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer to place all updates of these source codes in escrow and to notify the State Election Commission that this requirement has been met.

(I) After a vote recorder or optical scan voting system is approved, an improvement or change in the system must be submitted to the State Election Commission for approval pursuant to this section; however, this requirement does not apply to the technical capability of a general purpose computer or reader to electronically count and record votes or to a printer to accurately reproduce vote totals.

(J) If the State Election Commission determines that a vote recorder or optical scan voting system that was approved no longer meets the requirements set forth in subsections (A) and (C) or Section 7-13-1340, the commission may decertify that system. A decertified system shall not be used in elections unless the system is reapproved by the commission under subsections (A) and (C).

(K) Neither a member of the State Election Commission, any county election commission or custodian, nor a member of a county governing body shall have any pecuniary interest in any vote recorder, or in the manufacture or sale of the vote recorder.

SECTION 7-13-1340. Requirements for vote recorders.

No vote recorder shall be adopted or used unless it shall, at the time, satisfy the following requirements:

(a) It shall provide facilities for voting for such candidates as may be nominated and upon such questions as may be submitted;

(b) It shall permit each elector, at other than primaries, to vote a straight party or body ticket, with the exception of candidates for the offices of presidential electors, in one operation; and, in one operation, to vote for all the candidates of one party or body for presidential electors; and, in one operation, to vote for all the candidates of one party or body for every office to be voted for, except those offices as to which he votes for individual candidates and the offices of presidential electors;

(c) Except as provided in subsection (b) for presidential electors, it shall permit each elector, at other than primaries, to vote a ticket selected from the nominees of any and all parties or bodies, from independent nominations, and from persons not in nomination;

(d) It shall permit each elector to vote, at any election, for any person and for any office for whom and for which he is lawfully entitled to vote, whether or not the name of such person or persons appears upon a ballot label as a candidate for election, and to vote for as many persons for an office as he is entitled to vote for, and to vote for or against any question upon which he is entitled to vote;

(e) When used in conjunction with a tabulating machine, it shall preclude the counting of votes for any candidate, or upon any question, for whom or upon which an elector is not entitled to vote, and shall preclude the counting of votes for more persons for any office than he is entitled to vote for or for fewer than he is required to vote for, and shall preclude the counting of votes for any candidate for the same office or upon any question more than once;

(f) It shall permit voting in absolute secrecy, so that no person can see or know for whom any other elector has voted or is voting, save an elector whom he has assisted or is assisting in voting, as prescribed by law;

(g) It shall be constructed of material of good quality, in a neat and workmanlike manner;

(h) It shall, when properly operated, record correctly and accurately every vote cast;

(i) It shall be so constructed that an elector may readily learn the method of operating it; and

(j) It shall be safely transportable.

(k) If approved after July 1, 1999, or if an upgrade in software, hardware, or firmware is submitted for approval as required by Section 7-13-1330(C), the voting system must be able to electronically transmit vote totals for all elections to the State Election Commission in a format and time frame specified by the commission.

SECTION 7-13-1350. Payment for vote recorders.

The governing body of any county which adopts vote recorders in the manner provided for by this article shall, upon the purchase thereof, provide for payment therefor by the county.

SECTION 7-13-1360. Form and contents of ballot labels; primary elections.

(a) The ballot labels shall be printed in black ink, upon clear, white material, of such size and arrangement as will suit the construction of the vote recorder, and in plain, clear type so as to be easily readable by persons with normal vision.

(b) The arrangement of offices, names of candidates and questions upon the ballot labels shall conform as nearly as practicable to the provisions of law for the arrangement of same on paper ballots. Provided, however, that such form may be varied in order to present a clear presentation of candidates and questions to the electors. In the event that there are more candidates for any office than can be placed upon one page, the label shall be clearly marked to indicate that the names of candidates for the office are continued on the following page.

(c) The form and arrangement of ballot labels shall be prescribed and prepared by the State Election Commission.

(d) In primaries, separate vote recorders may be used for each political party. If the same vote recorder is used for two or more political parties on the same day, the ballot cards of each party shall be clearly identified and so designed that only votes cast for candidates of that party will be counted by the tabulating machine.

SECTION 7-13-1370. Ballot cards.

Ballot cards shall be of suitable design, size and stock, as prescribed by the State Election Commission, to permit processing by a tabulating machine. A serially-numbered stub and strip shall be attached to each ballot card in a manner and form similar to that prescribed by law for paper ballots.

SECTION 7-13-1371. Ballot cards used in conjunction with optical scanning device; instructions.

(A) Ballot cards used in conjunction with an optical scanning device must include an instruction to vote both sides of the ballot card. This instruction must appear conspicuously at the top and at the bottom of the front side of the ballot card and must be printed in bold-faced type at least as large as the largest type on the ballot card.

(B) The State Election Commission must establish the form of a sign to be displayed in any polling place utilizing an optical scanning device. This sign must notify voters to vote both sides of the ballot card and must be displayed in three conspicuous places in the polling place.

SECTION 7-13-1380. Write-in votes.

Electors shall be permitted to cast write-in votes. The design of the ballot card shall permit the managers in counting the write-in votes to determine readily whether an elector has cast any write-in vote not authorized by law. The State Election Commission in specifying the form of the ballot shall provide for ballot secrecy in connection with write-in votes.

SECTION 7-13-1390. Labeling, preparation, and testing of vote recorders; custodians and deputies; examination by interested persons.

(a) The election officials of each county shall cause the proper ballot labels to be placed on each vote recorder which is to be used in any election within such county and shall cause each vote recorder to be placed in proper order for voting.

(b) The election officials of each county shall appoint one custodian of vote recorders, and such deputy custodians as may be necessary, whose duty it shall be to prepare the vote recorders to be used in county elections. Each custodian and deputy custodian shall receive such compensation as provided for in the annual county appropriation. Such custodian shall, under the direction of the county election officials, have charge of and represent them during the preparation of the vote recorders as required by this article, and he and the deputy custodians, whose duty it shall be to assist him in the discharge of his duties, shall serve at the pleasure of the county election officials.

(c) On or before the third day preceding an election, the county election officials shall have the tabulating machines tested to ascertain that they will correctly count the votes cast for all offices and on all questions. Public notice of the time and place of the test shall be made at least five days prior thereto. Representatives of political parties and bodies, candidates, news media and the public shall be permitted to observe such tests. The test shall be conducted by processing a preaudited group of ballot cards clearly marked for such purpose, not to exceed fifty for each candidate or question, so punched or marked as to record a predetermined number of valid votes for each candidate and on each question, and shall include for each office one or more ballot cards which have votes in excess of or less than the number allowed by law in order to test the ability of the tabulating machine to reject such votes. The tabulating machine shall not be approved unless it produces an errorless counting. If any error is detected, the cause therefor shall be ascertained and corrected, and an errorless count shall be made before the machine is approved. The same test shall be repeated immediately before the start of the official count of the ballot cards and at the conclusion of such count. The county election officials or custodian shall also prepare the vote recorders for voting at the various polling places to be used in the election. In preparing the vote recorders, they shall arrange the recorders and the ballot labels so that they meet all requirements of voting and counting at such primary or election, thoroughly inspect and test the vote recorders, and file a certificate, as prescribed by the State Election Commission, in the office of the county election officials that the recorders are in proper order with correct ballot labels.

(d) Prior to the election, no county election officials, nor custodian, nor other employee shall in any way prevent free access to and examination of all voting machines which are to be used at the election under proper supervision and, at reasonable times, by any interested persons.

SECTION 7-13-1400. Delivery of vote recorders; duties of officials at polling places.

(a) The county election officials shall deliver the proper vote recorder or vote recorders, properly furnished with ballot labels, to the polling places at least one hour before the time set for opening the polls at each election, and shall cause each vote recorder to be set up in the proper manner for use in voting. Such election officials shall place each vote recorder in a voting booth so that the ballot labels on the recorder can be plainly seen by the poll officers when not being voted on.

(b) The county election officials shall provide ample protection against molestation of and injury to the vote recorder and, for that purpose, shall call upon any law-enforcement officer to furnish such assistance as may be necessary, and it shall be the duty of the law-enforcement officer to furnish such assistance when so requested by such officials.

(c) The poll manager shall furnish for each vote recorder at least one hour before the opening of the polls:

(1) Sufficient light to enable electors, while in the voting booth, to read the ballot labels and suitable for the use of poll officers in examining the vote recorder.

(2) Two sample ballots printed on a single sheet of white paper or a number of sheets stapled together which shall be a reasonable facsimile of the ballot labels to be used in the primary or election, and accompanied by directions for voting on the vote recorder; and such sample ballots shall be posted prominently outside the enclosed space within the polling place.

(3) A seal for sealing the vote recorder after the polls are closed and such other materials and supplies as may be necessary or as may be required by law or by rules and regulations of the State Election Commission.

SECTION 7-13-1410. Duties of officials after closing of polls; review of ballots; duplicate ballots.

Immediately following the closing of the polls, the manager shall:

(a) Count the number of electors who voted, as shown in the poll list.

(b) Count the unused ballots without removing stubs.

(c) Count the soiled and defaced ballots.

(d) Insert the totals of (a), (b) and (c) of this section on the report forms provided therefor.

(e) Count and secure or inactivate all marking devices in the polling place so that no device may be used or operated by any unauthorized person in the polling place.

(f) Remove the voted ballots from the containers and sort them according to types or parts of ballots if more than one type or part has been used. If the number of voted ballots exceeds the number of voters whose names appear upon the poll list, the managers shall enter on the poll list an explanation of such discrepancy. Any manager having a different explanation shall enter it on the poll list and subscribe to it.

Before leaving the precinct, each ballot shall be reviewed and, if there appear markings other than by the marking device or there are names of candidates in spaces authorized for write-in votes, such write-in votes shall be tabulated by the precinct officials and the results certified to the counting station. In such instance, the precinct officials shall first determine, for the contest in which a write-in vote has been cast, that the voter on such ballot has not, for such contest, voted contrary to the voting instructions for such contest. If it is determined that the voter has not violated such instructions, write-in votes shall be tabulated and the ballot shall be reinserted with the remainder of the ballots. If it is determined that the voter has violated the instruction for marking the ballot, then the entire ballot shall be tabulated by the precinct officials and the results certified to the counting station, or the county election commission may cause a duplicate to be made of that part of the ballot marked according to such instructions.

Provided, that if it appears that a ballot is so torn, bent, or otherwise defaced or has been marked by other than the marking device, so that it cannot be counted by the automatic tabulating equipment, the county election commission may cause a duplicate of each such ballot to be marked so that it can be so counted.

Such duplicate ballots, when so authorized by the commission, shall be prepared at the counting station in the presence of witnesses and substituted for the original ballots, which duplicate ballots shall be counted by the automatic tabulating equipment. The original ballots shall be preserved and all such duplicate ballots shall be clearly labeled with the word "duplicate" and shall bear a serial number which shall also be recorded on the original. At the counting station, write-in votes tabulated by the precinct officials shall be added to the results from ballots tabulated with the automatic tabulating equipment and the totals certified as the precinct count on the summary sheet.

(g) Put the unused ballots with the stubs attached, and soiled and defaced ballots with the stubs attached, in the envelopes or containers provided and certify the number. The voted ballots shall be placed in designated containers provided by the county election commission for use with automatic tabulating equipment, sealed, and the containers shall be sealed. Officials duly authorized by the county election commission shall then transport all of the ballots, precinct election supplies and records to the location designated by the commission for the processing or counting, or both, of such ballots.

SECTION 7-13-1420. Observation by poll watchers after polls close.

Poll watchers shall be allowed to remain in the polling place after the polls close and may observe the processing of the ballots and the sealing of the containers.

SECTION 7-13-1430. Counting stations; processing and counting of ballots and preparation of summary sheets.

In counties where marking devices and automatic tabulating equipment have been adopted, the county election commission shall establish one or more counting stations to receive voted ballots and other precinct election supplies after the polling precincts are closed. Such stations shall be under the supervision and direction of the commission. Processing and counting of voted ballots and the preparation of summary sheets shall be done in the presence of witnesses approved by the commission.

SECTION 7-13-1440. Witnesses are to observe at counting station.

Witnesses shall not be allowed in the polling place but shall file their certificates of appointment at the proper counting station after the polls close and may observe all functions there.

SECTION 7-13-1450. Public display of vote recorders preceding election.

During the thirty days next preceding a general election or during the ten days next preceding a special election, the county election officials shall place on public exhibition, in such public places and at such times as they may deem most suitable for the information and instruction of the electors, one or more vote recorders containing the ballot labels and showing the offices and questions to be voted upon, the names and arrangements of parties and bodies and, so far as practicable, the names and arrangements of the candidates to be voted for. Such recorder or recorders shall be under the charge and care of a person competent as custodian and instructor.

SECTION 7-13-1460. Use of paper ballots where use of vote recorders is not possible or practicable.

If a method of election for any candidate or office or of voting on any question is prescribed by law in which the use of vote recorders is not possible or practicable, or in case at any election the number of candidates seeking nomination or nominated for any office renders the use of vote recorders for such office at such election impracticable, or if for any other reason at any election the use of vote recorders wholly or in part is not practicable, the county election officials may arrange to have the voting for such candidates or offices or for such questions conducted by paper ballots. In such cases, paper ballots shall be printed for such candidates, offices or questions, and the election conducted by the poll managers herein provided for, and the ballots counted and return thereof made in the manner required by law for such nominations, offices or questions, insofar as paper ballots are used.

SECTION 7-13-1470. Procedure where vote recorder becomes out of order.

If any vote recorder being used in any election shall become out of order during such election, it shall be repaired, if possible, or another vote recorder substituted by the custodian or county election officials as promptly as possible, for which purpose the governing body of the county may purchase as many extra vote recorders as it may deem necessary, but in case such repair or substitution cannot be made, paper ballots, printed or written and of any suitable form, may be used for the taking of votes.

SECTION 7-13-1480. Custody, storage, and care of vote recorders.

The county election officials shall designate a person who shall have the custody of the vote recorders of the county when they are not in use at an election and shall provide for his compensation and for the safe storage and care of the vote recorders. All vote recorders when not in use shall be properly covered and stored in a suitable place or places.

SECTION 7-13-1490. Regulations, instructions and forms.

The State Election Commission shall adopt and promulgate such regulations and instructions and design such forms as it may deem necessary to carry out the purposes of this article. A sufficient number of such regulations, instructions and forms shall be distributed to each county election commission using the voting and counting equipment authorized by the provisions of this article.

SECTION 7-13-1500. Oath of person preparing or operating tabulating devices.

Any person who prepares or operates the tabulating devices in any election or preparatory thereto shall take an oath as a custodian and file in accordance with law.

ARTICLE 15.

VOTING MACHINES

SECTION 7-13-1610. State Board of Voting Machine Commissioners.

The Board of State Canvassers shall, ex officio, constitute the State Board of Voting Machine Commissioners.

SECTION 7-13-1620. Voting machine approval process.

(A) Before any kind of voting machine, including an electronic voting machine, is used at any election, it must be approved by the State Election Commission which shall examine the voting machine and make and file in the commission's office a report, attested to by the signature of the commission's executive director, stating whether, in the commission's opinion, the kind of voting machine so examined can be accurately and efficiently used by electors at elections, as provided by law. No voting machine may be approved for use in the State unless certified by an Independent Testing Authority (ITA) accredited by the National Association of State Election Directors and the State Election Commission as meeting or exceeding the minimum requirements of the Federal Election Commission's national voting system standards.

(B) When a voting machine has been approved for use before July 1, 1999, it may be used in elections. However, if the system's software or firmware is improved or changed, the system must comply with the requirements of subsection (A).

(C) Any person or company who requests an examination of any type of voting machine must pay a nonrefundable examination fee of one thousand dollars for a new voting system. A nonrefundable examination fee of five hundred dollars must be paid for an upgrade to any existing system. The State Election Commission may reexamine any voting machine when evidence is presented to the commission that the accuracy or the ability of the machine to be used satisfactorily in the conduct of elections is in question.

(D) Any person or company who seeks approval for any type of voting machine in this State must file with the State Election Commission a list of all states or jurisdictions in which that voting machine has been approved for use. This list must state how long the machine has been used in the state; contain the name, address, and telephone number of that state or jurisdiction's chief election official; and disclose any reports compiled by state or local government concerning the performance of the machine. The vendor is responsible for filing this information on an ongoing basis.

(E) Any person or individual who seeks approval for any type of voting machine must file with the State Election Commission copies of all contracts and maintenance agreements used in connection with the sale of the voting machine. All changes to standard contracts and maintenance agreements must be filed with the State Election Commission.

(F) Any person or company who seeks approval for any voting machine must conduct, under the supervision of the State Election Commission and any county election commission, a field test for any new voting machine, as part of the certification process. The field test shall involve South Carolina voters and election officials and must be conducted as part of a scheduled primary, general, or special election. This test must be held in two or more precincts, and all costs relating to the use of the voting machine must be borne by the vendor. The test must be designed to gauge voter reaction to the machine, problems that voters have with the machine, and the number of units required for the efficient operation of an election. The test must also demonstrate the accuracy of votes reported on the machine.

(G) Before any voting machine, approved after July 1, 1999, may be used in elections in the State, all source codes for the system must be placed in escrow by the manufacturer at the manufacturer's expense with the approved software ITA. These source codes must be available to the State Election Commission in the event that the company goes out of business, pursuant to court order, or in the event that the State Election Commission determines that an examination of these source codes is necessary. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer to place all updates of these source codes in escrow and to notify the State Election Commission that this requirement had been met.

(H) After a voting machine is approved, an improvement or change in the machine must be submitted to the State Election Commission for approval pursuant to this section; however, this requirement does not apply to the technical capability of a general purpose computer, reader, or printer.

(I) If the State Election Commission determines that a voting machine that was approved no longer meets the requirements of subsections (A) and (B) or Section 7-13-1640, the commission may decertify that machine. A decertified machine shall not be used in an election unless it is reapproved by the commission under subsections (A) and (B).

(J) No member of the State Election Commission, county election commission, custodian, or member of a county governing body may have any pecuniary interest in any voting machine or in the manufacture or sale of any voting machine.

SECTION 7-13-1630. [1962 Code Section 23-403; 1952 Code Section 23-403; 1950 (46) 2059]Repealed by 1999 Act No. 103, Section 8, eff June 30, 1999.

SECTION 7-13-1640. Voting machine requirements.

(A) Any kind or type of voting machine may be approved by the State Board of Voting Machine Commissioners which is so constructed as to fulfill the following requirements. It shall:

(1) provide facilities for voting for all candidates of as many political parties or organizations as may make nominations of candidates at any election, for or against as many questions as may be submitted at any election, and at all general or special elections, permit the voter to vote for all of the candidates of one party or in part for the candidates of one or more parties;

(2) permit the voter to vote for as many persons for any office as he is lawfully entitled to vote for, but no more;

(3) prevent the voter from voting for the same person more than once for the same office;

(4) permit the voter to vote for or against any question he may have the right to vote on, but no other;

(5) if used at a primary election, be so equipped that all rows except those of the voter's party can be locked out by the managers of election by means of an adjustment on the outside of the machine;

(6) correctly register or record and accurately count all votes cast for any and all candidates and for or against all questions;

(7) be provided with a "protective counter" or "protective device" whereby any operation of the machine before or after the election will be detected;

(8) be provided with a counter which shows at all times during an election how many persons have voted;

(9) be provided with either an illustration or a mechanical model, illustrating the manner of voting on the machine, suitable for the instruction of voters; and

(10) ensure voting in absolute secrecy.

(B) A machine must be provided with a device for each party and for each nomination by petition for voting for presidential and vice-presidential candidates in one operation and listing the candidates by name and by party or indicating the candidate is nominated by petition.

(C) If approved after July 1, 1999, or if an upgrade in software, hardware, or firmware is submitted for approval as required by Section 7-13-1620(B), the voting system must be able to electronically transmit vote totals for all elections to the State Election Commission in a format and time frame specified by the commission.

SECTION 7-13-1650. Experimental use of voting machines.

The governing body of any county, city or town may provide for the experimental use at an election in one or more districts or precincts of a machine which it might legally adopt without a formal adoption thereof, and its use at such election shall be as valid for all purposes as if it had been legally adopted.

SECTION 7-13-1660. Acquisition and use of approved voting machines by governing bodies.

The governing body of any county or of any city or town in this State may provide for use at elections any kind or type of voting machine that fulfills the requirements of this article and has been approved by the State Board of Voting Machine Commissioners, and the commissioners of election or other electoral board may use such voting machines at any and all general or special elections held in such county, city or town, or any part thereof, or in any one or more voting precincts therein, for voting, registering and counting votes cast at such elections. Any such governing body may purchase, lease or otherwise acquire such voting machines and provide for the payment therefor in such manner as such governing body may deem proper. Voting machines of different kinds may be adopted for use and used in different districts of the same city, town or county.

SECTION 7-13-1670. Demonstrations with machines for instruction of voters.

In any county, city or town in which voting machines are to be used, the commissioners of election or other electoral board may designate suitable and adequate times and places for the exhibition and demonstration of a voting machine containing sample ballots, showing the title of offices to be filled and, so far as practicable, the names of the candidates to be voted for at the next election for the purpose of giving instruction as to the use of a voting machine to all voters who may apply for it. No voting machine shall be used for such instruction after being prepared and sealed for use in an election. During such exhibition the counting mechanism of the voting machine shall be concealed from view.

SECTION 7-13-1680. Number of voting machines; type and use; repair; custody.

The governing body of any county or municipality providing voting machines at polling places for use at elections shall provide for each polling place at least one voting machine for each two hundred fifty registered voters or portion thereof or as near thereto as may be practicable. The machines shall be of the type approved as provided for in this title and shall be kept in complete and accurate working order and in proper repair. The machines may be used in such election districts or precincts in the county or municipality as the officials holding the election or conducting the primary may determine. The governing body of the county or municipality owning the machines shall have custody of such machines and other furniture or equipment of the polling places when not in use at an election.

SECTION 7-13-1690. Employment and qualifications of custodians of voting machines.

For the purpose of placing ballots in the frames of a machine, putting it in order and setting, testing, adjusting and delivering the machine, the commissioners of election or other electoral board may employ one or more competent persons, to be known as the custodians of voting machines, who shall be fully competent, thoroughly instructed and sworn to perform their duties honestly and faithfully. For such purpose such persons shall be appointed and instructed at least thirty days before the election and shall be considered as election officers.

SECTION 7-13-1700. Instruction of managers and clerks in use of machines; appointment of manager or clerk in emergency.

Not more than thirty days before each primary or general election, the commissioners of election or other electoral board must instruct the managers and clerks appointed to serve in the election in the use of the machine and their duties in connection therewith; and the commissioners shall not permit a person to serve as a manager or clerk, if there are clerks, who is not fully qualified to conduct an election with the machine. However, nothing in this section may be construed to prevent the appointment of a person as a manager or clerk of election to fill a vacancy in an emergency.

SECTION 7-13-1710. Voting machine ballots; arrangement of nominations.

In every county, city or town providing voting machines, the commissioners of election shall furnish to the managers of election a sufficient number of ballots printed on clear white paper, of such form and size as will fit the ballot frames of the machines, the arrangement of the names of the candidates on such ballots to be prescribed by the commissioners of election. Party nominations shall be arranged on each voting machine either in columns or horizontal rows, as shall nominations by petition, and the captions of the various ballots on such machines shall be so placed as to indicate to the voter what push knob, key lever or other device is to be used or operated in order to vote for the candidate or candidates of his choice.

SECTION 7-13-1720. Unopposed candidates in primaries.

In any party primary in which voting machines shall be used in one or more voting precincts, the name of any unopposed candidate for nomination for any office shall be omitted from the ballot used in any such voting machine, and such unopposed candidate shall be declared to have received the total number of votes cast in such voting precinct.

SECTION 7-13-1730. Use of separate ballots on constitutional amendments and other public measures.

Nothing in this article shall be construed as prohibiting the use of a separate ballot for constitutional amendments and other public measures.

SECTION 7-13-1740. Sample or instruction ballots.

The commissioners of election or other electoral board of any county, city or town in which voting machines are used shall provide for each voting precinct in which such machines are used two sample ballots or instruction ballots, which shall be arranged in the form of a diagram of the entire front of the voting machine as it will appear after the official ballots are arranged therein or thereon for voting on election day. Such sample ballots shall be open to public inspection at such polling place during the day of election.

SECTION 7-13-1750. Preparation of machines for elections; party representatives may examine machines.

Before preparing a voting machine for an election at which candidates for more than one political party or candidates nominated by petition are to be voted for, written notice must be mailed to the chairman of the local committee of each of the political parties that have certified candidates, stating the time and place where the machines will be prepared. At this time, one representative of each of these political parties must be afforded an opportunity to see that the machines are in proper condition for use at the election. When a machine has been examined by these representatives, it must be locked or sealed with a numbered seal in their presence. The representatives must certify as to the numbers of the machines, that all counters are set at zero (000), as to the number registered on the protective counter, and the number on the seal. When a voting machine has been properly prepared for an election, it must be locked or sealed against voting, and any necessary seals or keys to the machine retained in the custody of the commissioners of election or other electoral board and delivered to the managers of election as provided in this chapter.

SECTION 7-13-1760. Commissioners of election shall see that machines and other equipment are in place and good order.

The commissioners of election or other electoral board, as the case may be, shall have the voting machines and all necessary furniture and equipment at the polling places before the time fixed for the opening of the polls, have the counters on the machines set at zero (000) and otherwise have the machines in good and proper order for use at such election.

SECTION 7-13-1770. Duties of managers prior to opening polls; when machines may not be used for voting purposes.

The managers of each election precinct at which a voting machine is to be used shall meet at the voting place at least forty-five minutes before the time set for the opening of the polls at each election and shall proceed to arrange within the guard rail the furniture, supplies, and voting machine or machines for the conduct of the election. At that time, the managers shall post at least two instruction cards conspicuously within the polling place. If not previously done, they shall arrange, in their proper place on or in the voting machine, the ballots prepared for such election. A sealed envelope shall be delivered to the managers of election at least thirty minutes before the time set for the opening of the polls on which shall be written or printed the number of the voting machine, the number of any respective seals, and the number registered on the protective counter device. This envelope shall not be opened until all of the managers of election for the precinct are present at the polling place and have examined the envelope to see that it has not been opened. The machines, upon preparation for voting by the managers, shall not be operated except by voters in voting. Before opening the polls, each manager shall examine the machines and see that no vote has been cast and that the counters register zero (000). If any counter is found not to register zero (000), the managers shall not use the machine for voting purposes and notify the commissioners of election.

SECTION 7-13-1780. Placement of voting machines in polling places.

At all elections at which voting machines are used the exterior of the voting machine and every part of the polling place shall be in plain view of the managers and clerks, if there be clerks of election. The voting machine shall be placed at least three feet from every wall or partition of the polling place and at least five feet from any table at which any of the election managers or clerks, if there be clerks, may be engaged or seated. The voting machine shall be so placed that the ballots on the face of the machine can be plainly seen by the managers of the election when not in use by voters. The managers of election shall not themselves be, or permit any other person to be, in any position or near any position that will permit them to see or ascertain how a voter votes or how he has voted.

SECTION 7-13-1790. Lights and screens.

Every voting machine shall be furnished with a lantern or other proper light, if necessary, to enable the voters while voting to read the ballots. All voting machines used in any election shall be provided with screen, hood or booth which shall conceal the voter and his action while voting.

SECTION 7-13-1800. Inspection of machines; covering of counter compartment shall be kept locked; attendance at voting places.

One of the managers of election may inspect the face of the machine after each voter has cast his vote, to see that the ballots on the face of the machine are in their proper places and that the machine has not been injured. During an election the door or other covering of the counter compartment of the machine shall not be unlocked or open or the counters exposed except for good and sufficient reasons, a statement of which shall be made and signed by the managers of election and attached to the returns of election. No person shall be permitted in or about the voting place except as otherwise provided by law in elections in which paper ballots and ballot boxes are used.

SECTION 7-13-1810. Instructions of voters by model machine at polling place.

For the instruction of voters on any election day, there shall be provided for each polling place either an illustration or a mechanically operated model of a portion of the face of the machine. The illustration or model shall be located on the table of one of the managers or in some other place accessible to the voters. Each voter so desiring shall, before entering the machine, be instructed regarding its operation on either the illustration or the model and the voter given an opportunity personally to operate the model. The voter's attention may also be called to the diagram of the face of the machine so that the voter may become familiar with the location of the questions and names of the offices and candidates.

SECTION 7-13-1820. Persons within guard rail; time permitted voters to vote.

After the opening of the polls, the managers of election shall not permit any voter or other person to pass within the guard rail until they ascertain that he or she is entitled to vote, in the manner required by Section 7-13-710, as the case may be, and only one voter at a time for each voting machine at the voting place shall be permitted to pass within or be within the guard rail to vote. No voter shall remain within the voting machine booth longer than three minutes, and if he shall refuse to leave it after the lapse of three minutes, he may be removed by the managers.

SECTION 7-13-1830. Instruction after voter has entered machine.

In case any voter, after entering the voting machine, shall ask for further instructions concerning the manner of voting, two of the managers shall give such instructions to him, but no manager or other election officer shall in any manner request or seek to persuade or induce any such voter to vote any particular ticket or for or against any particular candidate or for or against any particular amendment, question or proposition. After giving such instructions the managers shall, before the voter has voted, retire and such voter shall cast his ballot in secret.

SECTION 7-13-1840. Assistance may be given to voters.

The provisions of this Title relating to the assistance to be given to voters shall also apply where voting machines are used.

SECTION 7-13-1850. Write-in ballots.

Ballots voted for any person whose name does not appear on the machine as a nominated candidate for office are herein referred to as "write-in ballots." All write-in ballots voted shall be deposited, written or affixed in a single receptacle or device, and the elector may vote in or by such receptacle or device for one or more persons whose names do not appear upon the machine with or without the names of one or more persons whose names do so appear. A write-in ballot must be cast in its appropriate place on the machine or it shall be void and not counted.

SECTION 7-13-1860. Duty to protect machines against injury.

After the voting machines have been delivered to the polling places, it shall be the duty of the commissioners of election or other electoral board to provide ample protection against molestation or injury to the machines.

SECTION 7-13-1870. Procedure when voting machine becomes inoperative.

In case any voting machine used in any election district shall, during the time the polls are open, become injured so as to render it inoperative in whole or in part, the managers shall give immediate notice thereof to the commissioners of election or other electoral board, and such commissioners or other electoral board shall, if possible, substitute a machine in good order for the injured machine, and at the close of the polls the record of both machines shall be taken and the votes shown on their counters shall be added together in ascertaining the results of the election. If no other machine is available for use at such election and the injured one cannot be repaired in time to continue use thereof at such election, unofficial ballots made as nearly as possible in the form of the official ballots may be used, received by the managers of election, placed in a receptacle in such case to be provided by the election officials and counted with the votes registered on the voting machine, and the result shall be declared as though there had been no accident to the voting machine. The ballots thus voted shall be preserved and returned with the statement of canvass with a certificate setting forth how and why they were voted.

SECTION 7-13-1880. Canvass and return of vote; return of provisional and failsafe ballots.

As soon as the polls of election are closed, the managers shall immediately lock or seal the voting machine against further voting and open the counter compartment in the presence of all persons who may be lawfully present at the time giving full view to the results, and they shall canvass and announce the results, including the votes recorded for each office on the independent ballots. They shall also announce the vote upon every amendment, proposition, or question voted upon, as provided by Section 7-13-110. The vote as registered shall be duly certified and sworn to and returned and filed as provided in this title for returning and filing election returns. No tally sheets or return blanks, as required by law for use in voting precincts in which paper ballots are used, need be furnished or used when voting machines are used, and no ballots need to be returned with the machine results except the provisional and failsafe ballots.

SECTION 7-13-1890. Machines shall remain locked after election; certification of managers or election; verification of results of election.

A sealed envelope having endorsed thereon a certificate of the managers of election stating the number of the machine, the voting precinct, the numbers on the seals, and the number on the protective counter and containing all used seals for this election shall be returned and delivered by one of the managers of the election to the commissioners or other electoral board from whom the envelope was received. After being locked or sealed by the managers of election, the voting machines shall remain locked or sealed for as long as may be necessary or advisable because of any contest of the result of the election, except as may be necessary to prepare the machines for another election and except that they may be opened and all data examined by the authority responsible for conducting the election in order to ascertain or verify the machine results of the election; however, this examination may be conducted only if all candidates in an affected race, or their representatives, are notified and given an opportunity to be present, or upon the order of a court of competent jurisdiction.

SECTION 7-13-1900. Use of voting machines for primary elections.

If in any county, city or town voting machines shall have been provided under the provisions of this article for use at general and special elections, such machines shall be used at primary elections in such county, city or town. When so used all provisions of this article applying to their use at general or special elections shall apply, so far as applicable, to the use of such voting machines at such primary elections.

SECTION 7-13-1910. Possession of voting machine key by unauthorized person.

Any unauthorized person found in possession of any voting machine key shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not less than twenty-five nor more than five hundred dollars and imprisoned in jail not less than ten nor more than ninety days, or both so fined and imprisoned, in the discretion of the court.

SECTION 7-13-1920. Tampering with voting machine.

Any person who wilfully tampers with or attempts to tamper with, disarrange, deface or impair, in any manner whatsoever, or destroy any such voting machine while it is in use at any election or who shall, after such machine is locked in order to preserve the registration or record of any election made by it, tamper with or attempt to tamper with such machine or who instigates, aids or abets any other person in any case herein mentioned, with intent to destroy or change the record of votes on a voting machine, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be imprisoned for not less than three months nor more than three years.

SECTION 7-13-1930. Other provisions of this Title applicable to use of voting machines.

All of the provisions of this Title not inconsistent with the provisions of this article shall apply with full force and effect to elections in counties, cities and towns adopting and using voting machines.

ARTICLE 17.

EXPLANATION OF PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

SECTION 7-13-2110. Authorization of simplified or more detailed explanation of proposed constitutional amendments.

In addition to all other requirements of law and the Constitution of this State, when any proposed amendment to the Constitution is submitted to the electorate for approval or disapproval in the general election and the proposed amendment is of such nature that it might not be clearly understood by the voters, a simplified or, when appropriate, more detailed explanation of the meaning and effect of such amendment shall be placed upon the ballot along with the proposed amendment question. When mechanical devices for voting are used, printed copies of such explanation shall be made available at each voting precinct. The provisions of this section shall apply only to statewide amendments.

SECTION 7-13-2120. Constitutional Ballot Commission.

To establish an agency to determine whether or not a proposed constitutional amendment requires a simplified or more detailed explanation as provided for in Section 7-13-2110, there is hereby created the Constitutional Ballot Commission composed of the Attorney General, the Director of the State Election Commission and the Director of the Legislative Council. Prior to the printing of ballots in each general election year in which proposed constitutional amendments are voted upon, the Commission shall meet at the call of the Attorney General and:

(1) Consider each proposed amendment and make a determination as to whether or not a simplified or more detailed explanation is necessary or appropriate; and

(2) In those cases where it is determined that an explanation is deemed necessary or appropriate, phrase such explanation and submit it to the State Election Commission under the signatures of at least a majority of the ballot commissioners. The Election Commission shall arrange for the placement of amendment explanations on ballots and make them available to the news media, upon request, at least ten days prior to the general election.

SECTION 7-13-2130. Jurisdiction of proceedings challenging explanations.

The State Supreme Court shall have exclusive and original jurisdiction in any proceeding challenging the amendment explanations prepared by the Ballot Commission.

ARTICLE 19.

GENERAL, SPECIAL, AND PRIMARY ELECTIONS RESULTING IN A TIE

SECTION 7-13-2210. General or special election.

If any general election or special election, other than a nonpartisan municipal election, results in a tie vote and no candidate withdraws, the election officials who conducted the tie election shall conduct a runoff election to break the tie two weeks following the tie election. In the tie-breaking runoff, the laws of this State apply, mutatis mutandi. If the date for the tie-breaking runoff falls on a legal holiday, it must be held on the same day of the first week following which is not a legal holiday.

SECTION 7-13-2220. Primary election.

If any primary election, other than a nonpartisan municipal primary election, results in a tie vote and no candidate withdraws, the party officials shall conduct a runoff election to break the tie two weeks following that election. In the tie-breaking election, the laws of this State apply, mutatis mutandi. If the date for the tie-breaking runoff election falls on a legal holiday, it must be held on the same day of the first week following which is not a legal holiday. If a tie-breaking runoff election is required, any remaining primary elections required are postponed for two weeks. If the date for a postponed election falls on a legal holiday, it must be set for the same day of the first week following which is not a legal holiday.





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