1976 South Carolina Code of Laws
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Title 24 - Corrections, Jails, Probations, Paroles and Pardons

CHAPTER 21.

PROBATION, PAROLE AND PARDON

ARTICLE 1.

BOARD OF PROBATION, PAROLE, AND PARDON SERVICES

SECTION 24-21-5. Definitions.

As used in this chapter:

(1) "Administrative monitoring" means a form of monitoring by the department beyond the end of the term of supervision in which the only remaining condition of supervision not completed is the payment of financial obligations. Under administrative monitoring, the only condition of the monitoring shall be the requirement that reasonable progress be made toward the payment of financial obligations. The payment of monitoring mandated fees shall continue. When an offender is placed on administrative monitoring, he shall register with the department's representative in his county, notify the department of his current address each quarter, and make payments on financial obligations owed, until the financial obligations are paid in full or a consent order of judgment is filed.

(2) "Criminal risk factors" mean characteristics and behaviors that, when addressed or changed, affect a person's risk for committing crimes. The characteristics may include, but not be limited to, the following risk and criminogenic need factors: antisocial behavior patterns; criminal personality; antisocial attitudes, values, and beliefs; poor impulse control; criminal thinking; substance abuse; criminal associates; dysfunctional family or marital relationships; or low levels of employment or education.

(3) "Department" means the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

(4) "Evidence-based practices" mean supervision policies, procedures, and practices that scientific research demonstrates reduce recidivism among individuals on probation, parole, or post-correctional supervision.

(5) "Financial obligations" mean fines, fees, and restitution either ordered by the court or statutorily imposed.

(6) "Hearing officer" means an employee of the department who conducts preliminary hearings to determine probable cause on alleged violations committed by an individual under the supervision of the department and as otherwise provided by law. This includes, but is not limited to, violations concerning probation, parole, and community supervision. The hearing officer also conducts preliminary hearings and final revocation hearings for supervised furlough, youthful offender conditional release cases, and such other hearings as required by law.

HISTORY: 2010 Act No. 273, Section 45, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-10. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; Board of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; board members; term; appointment; filing vacancies.

(A) The department is governed by its director. The director must be appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. To qualify for appointment, the director must have a baccalaureate or more advanced degree from an institution of higher learning that has been accredited by a regional or national accrediting body, which is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and must have at least ten years of training and experience in one or more of the following fields: parole, probation, corrections, criminal justice, law, law enforcement, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, or social work.

(B) The Board of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services is composed of seven members. The terms of office of the members are for six years. Six of the seven members must be appointed from each of the congressional districts and one member must be appointed at large. The at-large appointee shall have at least five years of work or volunteer experience in one or more of the following fields: parole, probation, corrections, criminal justice, law, law enforcement, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, or social work. Vacancies must be filled by gubernatorial appointment with the advice and consent of the Senate for the unexpired term. If a vacancy occurs during a recess of the Senate, the Governor may fill the vacancy by appointment for the unexpired term pending the consent of the Senate, provided the appointment is received for confirmation on the first day of the Senate's next meeting following the vacancy. A chairman must be elected annually by a majority of the membership of the board. The chairman may serve consecutive terms.

(C) The Governor shall deliver an appointment within sixty days of the expiration of a term, if an individual is being reappointed, or within ninety days of the expiration of a term, if an individual is an initial appointee. If a board member who is being reappointed is not confirmed within sixty days of receipt of the appointment by the Senate, the appointment is considered rejected. For an initial appointee, if confirmation is not made within ninety days of receipt of the appointment by the Senate, the appointment is deemed rejected. The Senate may by resolution extend the period after which an appointment is considered rejected. If the failure of the Senate to confirm an appointee would result in the lack of a quorum of board membership, the seat for which confirmation is denied or rejected shall not be considered when determining if a quorum of board membership exists.

(D) Within ninety days of a parole board member's appointment by the Governor and confirmation by the Senate, the board member must complete a comprehensive training course developed by the department using training components consistent with those offered by the National Institute of Corrections or the American Probation and Parole Association. This training course must include classes regarding the following:

(1) the elements of the decision making process, through the use of evidence-based practices for determining offender risk, needs and motivations to change, including the actuarial assessment tool that is used by the parole agent;

(2) security classifications as established by the Department of Corrections;

(3) programming and disciplinary processes and the department's supervision, case planning, and violation process;

(4) the dynamics of criminal victimization; and

(5) collaboration with corrections related stakeholders, both public and private, to increase offender success and public safety.

The department must promulgate regulations setting forth the minimum number of hours of training required for the board members and the specific requirements of the course that the members must complete.

(E)(1) Each parole board member is also required to complete a minimum of eight hours of training annually, which shall be provided for in the department's annual budget. This annual training course must be developed using the training components consistent with those offered by the National Institute of Corrections or American Probation and Parole Association and must offer classes regarding:

(a) a review and analysis of the effectiveness of the assessment tool used by the parole agents;

(b) a review of the department's progress toward public safety goals;

(c) the use of data in decision making; and

(d) any information regarding promising and evidence-based practices offered in the corrections related and crime victim dynamics field.

The department must promulgate regulations setting forth the specific criteria for the course that the members must complete.

(2) If a parole board member does not fulfill the training as provided in this section, the Governor, upon notification, must remove that member from the board unless the Governor grants the parole board member an extension to complete the training, based upon exceptional circumstances.

(F) The department must develop a plan that includes the following:

(1) establishment of a process for adopting a validated actuarial risk and needs assessment tool consistent with evidence-based practices and factors that contribute to criminal behavior, which the parole board shall use in making parole decisions, including additional objective criteria that may be used in parole decisions;

(2) establishment of procedures for the department on the use of the validated assessment tool to guide the department, parole board, and agents of the department in determining supervision management and strategies for all offenders under the department's supervision, including offender risk classification, and case planning and treatment decisions to address criminal risk factors and reduce offender risk of recidivism; and

(3) establishment of goals for the department, which include training requirements, mechanisms to ensure quality implementation of the validated assessment tool, and safety performance indicators.

(G) The director shall submit the plan in writing to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee no later than July 1, 2011. Thereafter, the department must submit an annual report to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee on its performance for the previous fiscal year and plans for the upcoming year. The department must collect and report all relevant data in a uniform format of both board decisions and field services and must annually compile a summary of past practices and outcomes.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-551; 1952 Code Section 55-551; 1942 Code Section 1038-5; 1942 (42) 1456, 1463; 1946 (44) 1516; 1976 Act No. 509, Section 1; 1981 Act No. 100, Sections 1-3; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 1; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 4; 1995 Act No. 7, Part I, Section 38; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 46, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-11. Removal of director or member.

The director and members of the board shall be subject to removal by the Governor pursuant to the provisions of Section 1-3-240.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 4; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 460.

SECTION 24-21-12. Compensation of board members.

The members of the board shall draw no salaries, but each member shall be entitled to such per diem as may be authorized by law for boards, commissions, and committees, plus actual and necessary expenses incurred pursuant to the discharge of official duties.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 4; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 461.

SECTION 24-21-13. Director to oversee department; development of written policies and procedures; board's duty to consider cases for parole, etc.

(A) It is the duty of the director to oversee, manage, and control the department. The director shall develop written policies and procedures for the following:

(1) the supervising of offenders on probation, parole, community supervision, and other offenders released from incarceration prior to the expiration of their sentence, which supervising shall be based on a structured decision-making guide designed to enhance public safety, which uses evidence-based practices and focuses on considerations of offenders' criminal risk factors;

(2) the consideration of paroles and pardons and the supervision of offenders in the community supervision program and other offenders released from incarceration prior to the expiration of their sentence. The requirements for an offender's participation in the community supervision program and an offender's progress toward completing the program are to be decided administratively by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services. No inmate or future inmate shall have a "liberty interest" or an "expectancy of release" while in a community supervision program administered by the department;

(3) the operation of community-based correctional services and treatment programs; and

(4) the operation of public work sentence programs for offenders as provided in item (1) of this subsection. This program also may be utilized as an alternative to technical revocations. The director shall establish priority programs for litter control along state and county highways. This must be included in the "public service work" program.

(B) It is the duty of the board to consider cases for parole, pardon, and any other form of clemency provided for under law.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 4; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 10; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 2; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 462; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 39; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 47, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-30. Meetings; parole and pardon panels.

(A) A person who commits a "no parole offense" as defined in Section 24-13-100 on or after the effective date of this section is not eligible for parole consideration, but must complete a community supervision program as set forth in Section 24-21-560 prior to discharge from the sentence imposed by the court. For all offenders who are eligible for parole, the board shall hold regular meetings, as may be necessary to carry out its duties, but at least four times each year, and as many extra meetings as the chairman, or the Governor acting through the chairman, may order. The board may preserve order at its meetings and punish any disrespect or contempt committed in its presence. The chairman may direct the members of the board to meet as three-member panels to hear matters relating to paroles and pardons as often as necessary to carry out the board's responsibilities. Membership on these panels shall be periodically rotated on a random basis by the chairman. At the meetings of the panels, any unanimous vote shall be considered the final decision of the board, and the panel may issue an order of parole with the same force and effect of an order issued by the full board pursuant to Section 24-21-650. Any vote that is not unanimous shall not be considered as a decision of the board, and the matter shall be referred to the full board which shall decide it based on a vote of a majority of the membership.

(B) The board may grant parole to an offender who commits a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60 which is not included as a "no parole offense" as defined in Section 24-13-100 on or after the effective date of this section by a two-thirds majority vote of the full board. The board may grant parole to an offender convicted of an offense which is not a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60 or a "no parole offense" as defined in Section 24-13-100 by a unanimous vote of a three-member panel or by a majority vote of the full board.

Nothing in this subsection may be construed to allow any person who commits a "no parole offense" as defined in Section 24-13-100 on or after the effective date of this section to be eligible for parole.

(C) The board shall conduct all parole hearings in cases that relate to a single victim on the same day.

(D) Upon the request of a victim, the board may allow the victim and an offender to appear simultaneously before the board for the purpose of providing testimony.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-553; 1952 Code Section 55-553; 1942 Code Sections 3437, 3439; 1932 Code Sections 3437, 3439; Civ. C. '22 Sections 979, 981; Civ. C. '12 Sections 890, 892; 1906 (25) 14; 1981 Act No. 100 Section 5; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 40; 2004 Act No. 263, Section 13.

SECTION 24-21-32. Reentry supervision; revocation.

(A) For purposes of this section, "release date" means the date determined by the South Carolina Department of Corrections on which an inmate is released from prison, based on the inmate's sentence and all earned credits allowed by law.

(B) Notwithstanding the provisions of this chapter, an inmate, who is not required to participate in a community supervision program pursuant to Article 6, Chapter 21, Title 24, shall be placed on reentry supervision with the department before the expiration of the inmate's release date. Inmates who have been incarcerated for a minimum of two years shall be released to reentry supervision one hundred eighty days before their release date. For an inmate whose sentence includes probation, the period of reentry supervision is reduced by the term of probation.

(C) The individual terms and conditions of reentry supervision shall be developed by the department using an evidence-based assessment of the inmate's needs and risks. An inmate placed on reentry supervision must be supervised by a probation agent of the department. The department shall promulgate regulations for the terms and conditions of reentry supervision. Until such time as regulations are promulgated, the terms and conditions shall be based on guidelines developed by the director.

(D) If the department determines that an inmate has violated a term or condition of reentry supervision sufficient to revoke the reentry supervision, a probation agent must initiate a proceeding before a department administrative hearing officer. The proceeding must be initiated pursuant to a warrant or a citation describing the violations of the reentry supervision. No inmate arrested for violation of a term or condition of reentry supervision may be released on bond; however, he shall be credited with time served as set forth in Section 24-13-40 toward his release date. If the administrative hearing officer determines the inmate has violated a term or condition of reentry supervision, the hearing officer may impose other terms or conditions set forth in the regulations or department guidelines, and may continue the inmate on reentry supervision, or the hearing officer may revoke the inmate's reentry supervision and the inmate shall be incarcerated up to one hundred eighty days, but the maximum aggregate time that the inmate shall serve on reentry supervision or for revocation of the reentry supervision shall not exceed an amount of time equal to the length of incarceration imposed by the court for the offense that the inmate was serving at the time of his initial reentry supervision. The decision of the administrative hearing officer on the reentry supervision shall be final and there shall be no appeal of his decision.

HISTORY: 2010 Act No. 273, Section 48, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-35. Administrative recommendations available to victim prior to parole hearing.

The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services Board shall make its administrative recommendations available to a victim of a crime before it conducts a parole hearing for the perpetrator of the crime.

HISTORY: 2004 Act No. 263, Section 2.

SECTION 24-21-40. Record of proceedings.

The Board shall keep a complete record of all its proceedings and hold it subject to the order of the Governor or the General Assembly.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-554; 1952 Code Section 55-554; 1942 Code Section 3435; 1932 Code Section 3435; Civ. C. '22 Section 977; Civ. C. '12 Section 888; 1906 (25) 14.

SECTION 24-21-50. Hearings, arguments, and appearances by counsel or individuals.

The board shall grant hearings and permit arguments and appearances by counsel or any individual before it at any such hearing while considering a case for parole, pardon, or any other form of clemency provided for under law. No inmate has a right of confrontation at the hearing.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-555; 1952 Code Section 55-555; 1942 Code Section 1038-11; 1942 (42) 1456; 1946 (44) 1516; 1947 (45) 67; 1949 (46) 311; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 41.

SECTION 24-21-55. Hearing fee.

The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services shall receive a hearing fee under a plan approved by the Budget and Control Board.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 356, Section 1, Pt IV.A.

SECTION 24-21-60. Cooperation of public agencies and officials; surveys.

Each city, county, or state official or department shall assist and cooperate to further the objectives of this chapter. The board, the director of the department, and the probation agents may seek the cooperation of officials and departments and especially of the sheriffs, jailers, magistrates, police officials, and institutional officers. The director may conduct surveys of state correctional facilities, county jails, and camps and obtain information to enable the board to pass intelligently upon all applications for parole. The Director of the Department of Corrections and the wardens, jailers, sheriffs, supervisors, or other officers in whose control a prisoner may be committed must aid and assist the director and the probation agents in the surveys.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-556; 1952 Code Section 55-556; 1942 Code Section 1038-13; 1942 (42) 1456; 1960 (51) 1917; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 3; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 1; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 463; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 42.

SECTION 24-21-70. Records of prisoners.

The Director of the Department of Corrections, when a prisoner is confined in the State Penitentiary, the sheriff of the county, when a person is confined in the county jail, and the county supervisor or chairman of the governing body of the county if there is no county supervisor, when a prisoner is confined upon a work detail of a county, must keep a record of the industry, habits, and deportment of the prisoner, as well as other information requested by the board or the director and furnish it to them upon request.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-557; 1952 Code Section 55-557; 1942 Code Section 1038-13; 1942 (42) 1456; 1960 (51) 1917; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 4; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 2; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 464.

SECTION 24-21-80. Probationers and parolees to pay supervision fee; intensive supervision fee; hardship exemption; delinquencies; substitution of public service.

An adult placed on probation, parole, or community supervision shall pay a regular supervision fee toward offsetting the cost of his supervision for so long as he remains under supervision. The regular supervision fee must be determined by the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services based upon the ability of the person to pay. The fee must be not less than twenty dollars nor more than one hundred dollars per month. The fee is due on the date of sentencing or as soon as determined by the department and each subsequent anniversary for the duration of the supervision period. The department shall remit from the fees collected an amount not to exceed the regular supervision fees collected during fiscal year 1992-93 for credit to the State General Fund. All regular supervision fees collected in excess of the fiscal year 1992-93 amount must be retained by the department, carried forward, and applied to the department's operation. The payment of the fee must be a condition of probation, parole, or community supervision, and a delinquency of two months or more in making payments may operate as a revocation.

If a probationer is placed under intensive supervision by a court of competent jurisdiction, or if the board places a parolee under intensive supervision, or if an inmate who is participating in the Supervised Furlough Program is placed under intensive supervision, or if a person participating in a community supervision program is placed under intensive supervision, the probationer, parolee, inmate, or community supervisee is required to pay not less than ten dollars nor more than thirty dollars each week for the duration of intensive supervision in lieu of the regular supervision fee. The intensive supervision fee must be determined by the department based upon the ability of the person to pay. Fees derived from persons under intensive supervision must be retained by the department, carried forward, and applied to the department's operation. The department may exempt any individual supervised by the department on any community supervision program from the payment of a part or all of the yearly or weekly fee during any part or all of the supervision period only if the department determines that exceptional circumstances exist such that these payments work a severe hardship on the individual. Delinquencies of two months or more in payment of a reduced fee operates in the same manner as delinquencies for the full amount. The department may substitute public service employment for supervision fees when it considers the same to be in the best interest of the State and the individual.

HISTORY: 1980 Act No. 517, Part II, Section 6A; 1985 Act No. 201, Part II, Section 58A; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 5; 1993 Act No. 164, Part II, Section 26A; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 43.

SECTION 24-21-85. Electronic monitoring fees.

Every person placed on electronic monitoring must be assessed a fee to be determined by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services in accordance with Section 24-21-80, as long as he remains in the electronic monitoring program. The payment of the fee must be a condition of supervision of any program administered by the department and a delinquency of two months or more in making payments may operate as a revocation. All fees generated by this assessment must be retained by the department to support the electronic monitoring program and carried forward for the same purpose.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 356, Section 1, Pt IV.B.

SECTION 24-21-87. Extradition and maintenance polygraph fees.

(A) The department may charge offenders a fee based on the number of miles and length of time required to perform an extradition. The fee must be used to offset the cost of extradition. All unexpended revenues of this fee at year end must be retained and carried forward by the department and expended for the same purpose.

(B) The department may charge a fee to offenders required to have maintenance polygraphs. This fee may not exceed the actual cost of the maintenance polygraph. All unexpended revenues of this fee at year end must be retained and carried forward by the department and expended for the same purpose.

HISTORY: 2008 Act No. 353, Section 2, Pt 15.B, eff July 1, 2009.

SECTION 24-21-90. Account and receipt for fee payments; deposit of funds.

Each supervising agent shall keep an accurate account of the money he collects pursuant to Sections 24-21-80, 24-23-210(B), and 24-23-220 and shall give a receipt to the probationer and individual under supervision for each payment. Money collected must be forwarded to the board and deposited in the state treasury.

HISTORY: 1980 Act No. 517, Part II, Section 6B; 1982 Act No. 455, Section 5; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 6.

SECTION 24-21-100. Administrative monitoring when fines outstanding; fee.

(A) Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 24-19-120, 24-21-440, 24-21-560(B), or 24-21-670, when an individual has not fulfilled his obligations for payment of financial obligations by the end of his term of supervision, then the individual shall be placed under quarterly administrative monitoring, as defined in Section 24-21-5, by the department until such time as those financial obligations are paid in full or a consent order of judgment is filed. If the individual under administrative monitoring fails to make reasonable progress toward the payment of such financial obligations, as determined by the department, the department may petition the court to hold an individual in civil contempt for failure to pay the financial obligations. If the court finds the individual has the ability to pay but has not made reasonable progress toward payment, the court may hold the individual in civil contempt of court and may impose a term of confinement in the local detention center until payment of the financial obligations, but in no case to exceed ninety days of confinement. Following any term of confinement, the individual shall be returned to quarterly administrative monitoring by the department. If the individual under administrative monitoring does not have the ability to pay the financial obligations and has no reasonable likelihood of being able to pay in the future, the department may submit a consent order of judgment to the court, which shall relieve the individual of any further administrative monitoring.

(B) An individual placed on administrative monitoring shall pay a regular monitoring fee toward offsetting the cost of his administrative monitoring for the period of time that he remains under monitoring. The regular monitoring fee must be determined by the department based upon the ability of the person to pay. The fee must not be more than ten dollars a month. All regular monitoring fees must be retained by the department, carried forward, and applied to the department's operation.

HISTORY: 2010 Act No. 273, Section 52, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-110. Administrative sanctions.

(A) In response to a violation of the terms and conditions of any supervision program operated by the department, whether pursuant to statute or contract with another state agency, the probation agent may, with the concurrence of his supervisor and, as an alternative to issuing a warrant or citation, serve on the offender a notice of administrative sanctions. The agent must not serve a notice of administrative sanctions on an offender for violations of special conditions if a sentencing court provided that those violations would be heard by the court. The administrative sanctions must be equal to or less restrictive than the sanctions available to the revoking authority, with the exception of revocation.

(B) If the offender agrees in writing to the additional conditions set forth in the notice or order of administrative sanctions, the conditions must be implemented with swiftness and certainty. If the offender does not agree, or if after agreeing the offender fails to fulfill the additional conditions to the satisfaction of the probation agent and his supervisor, then the probation agent may commence revocation proceedings.

(C) In addition to the notice of administrative sanctions, a hearing officer with the department may, as an alternative to sending a case forward to the revoking authority, impose on the offender an order of administrative sanctions. The order may be made only after the hearing officer has made a finding of probable cause at a preliminary hearing that an offender has violated the terms and conditions of any supervision program operated by the department, whether pursuant to statute or a contract with another state agency. The administrative sanctions must be equal to or less restrictive than the sanctions available to the revoking authority, with the exception of revocation. The sanctions must be implemented with swiftness and certainty.

(D) The administrative sanctions shall be established by regulations of the department, as set forth by established administrative procedures. The department shall delineate in the regulations a listing of administrative sanctions for the most common types of supervision violations including, but not limited to: failure to report; failure to pay fines, fees, and restitution; failure to participate in a required program or service; failure to complete community service; and failure to refrain from the use of alcohol or controlled substances. The sanctions shall consider the severity of the current violation, the offender's previous criminal record, the number and severity of previous supervision violations, the offender's assessment, and the extent to which administrative sanctions were imposed for previous violations. The department, in determining the list of administrative sanctions to be served on an offender, shall ascertain the availability of community-based programs and treatment options including, but not limited to: inpatient and outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities; day reporting centers; restitution centers; intensive supervision; electronic monitoring; community service; programs to reduce criminal risk factors; and other community-based options consistent with evidence-based practices.

(E) The department shall provide annually to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee:

(1) the number of offenders who were placed on administrative sanctions during the prior fiscal year and who were not returned to incarceration within that fiscal year;

(2) the number and percentage of offenders whose supervision programs were revoked for violations of the conditions of supervision and ordered to serve a term of imprisonment. This calculation shall be based on the fiscal year prior to the fiscal year in which the report is required. The baseline revocation rate shall be the revocation rate in Fiscal Year 2010; and

(3) the number and percentage of offenders who were convicted of a new offense and sentenced to a term of imprisonment. This calculation shall be based on the fiscal year prior to the fiscal year in which the report is required. The baseline revocation rate shall be the revocation rate in Fiscal Year 2010.

HISTORY: 2010 Act No. 273, Section 53, eff January 1, 2011.

ARTICLE 3.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PROBATION, PAROLE, AND PARDON SERVICES; PROBATION OFFICERS

SECTION 24-21-220. Powers and duties of director.

The director is vested with the exclusive management and control of the department and is responsible for the management of the department and for the proper care, assessment, treatment, supervision, and management of offenders under its control. The director shall manage and control the department and it is the duty of the director to carry out the policies of the department. The director is responsible for scheduling board meetings, assuring that the proper cases and investigations are prepared for the board, maintaining the board's official records, and performing other administrative duties relating to the board's activities. The director must employ within his office such personnel as may be necessary to carry out his duties and responsibilities including the functions of probation, parole, and community supervision, community-based programs, financial management, research and planning, staff development and training, and internal audit. The director shall make annual written reports to the board, the Governor, and the General Assembly providing statistical and other information pertinent to the department's activities.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-572; 1952 Code Section 55-572; 1942 Code Section 1038-7; 1942 (42) 1456; 1946 (44) 1516; 1981 Act No. 100, Section 7; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 4; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 465; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 44; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 49, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-221. Notice of hearing to consider parole; to whom required.

The director must give a thirty-day written notice of any board hearing during which the board will consider parole for a prisoner to the following persons:

(1) any victim of the crime who suffered damage to his person as a result thereof or if such victim is deceased, to members of his immediate family to the extent practicable;

(2) the solicitor who prosecuted the prisoner or his successor in the jurisdiction in which the crime was prosecuted; and

(3) the law enforcement agency that was responsible for the arrest of the prisoner concerned.

HISTORY: 1991 Act No. 134, Section 5; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 466.

SECTION 24-21-230. Employment of probation agents and other staff; employment and duties of hearing officers.

(A) The director must employ probation agents required for service in the State and clerical assistants as necessary. The probation agents must take and pass psychological and qualifying examinations as directed by the director. The director must ensure that each probation agent receives adequate training. Until the initial employment requirements are met, no person may take the oath of a probation agent nor exercise the authority granted to them.

(B) The director must employ hearing officers who conduct preliminary hearings to determine probable cause on violations committed by individuals under the supervision of the department and as otherwise provided by law. This includes, but is not limited to, violations concerning probation, parole, and community supervision. The hearing officer also conducts preliminary hearings and final revocation hearings for supervised furlough, youthful offender conditional release cases, and such other hearings as required by law. The department shall promulgate regulations for the qualifications of the hearing officers and the procedures for the preliminary hearings. Until regulations are adopted, the qualifications and procedures shall be based on guidelines developed by the director.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-573; 1952 Code Section 55-573; 1942 Code Section 1038-7; 1942 (42) 1456; 1946 (44) 1516; 1981 Act No. 100, Section 8; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 1993 Act No. 181, Section 467; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 45; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 51, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-235. Issuance of duty clothing to department employees.

The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services is authorized to issue duty clothing for the use of department employees.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 356, Section 1, Pt IV.D.

SECTION 24-21-237. Employee meals.

Meals may be provided to employees of the department who are not permitted to leave duty stations and are required to work during deployments, actual emergencies, emergency simulation exercises, and when the Governor declares a state of emergency.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 356, Section 1, Pt IV.E.

SECTION 24-21-240. Oath of probation agents.

Each person appointed as a probation agent must take an oath of office as required of state officers which must be noted of record by the clerk of court.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-574; 1952 Code Section 55-574; 1942 Code Section 1038-8; 1942 (42) 1456; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 7.

SECTION 24-21-250. Pay and expenses of probation agents.

The probation agents must be paid salaries, to be fixed by the department, payable semimonthly, and also be paid traveling and other necessary expenses incurred in the performance of their official duties when the expense accounts have been authorized and approved by the director.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-575; 1952 Code Section 55-575; 1942 Code Section 1038-8; 1942 (42) 1456; 1946 (44) 1516; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 7; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 8; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 468.

SECTION 24-21-260. Probation agents' assignment locations.

Probation agents appointed under Section 24-21-230 must be assigned to serve in courts or districts or other places the director may determine.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-576; 1952 Code Section 55-576; 1942 Code Section 1038-8; 1942 (42) 1456; 1946 (44) 1516; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 8; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 9; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 469.

SECTION 24-21-270. Offices for probation agents.

The governing body of each county in which a probation agent serves shall provide, in or near the courthouse, suitable office space for such agent.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-577; 1952 Code Section 55-577; 1942 Code Section 1038-15; 1942 (42) 1456; 1965 (54) 213; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 10.

SECTION 24-21-280. Duties and powers of probation agents; authority to enforce criminal laws.

(A) A probation agent must investigate all cases referred to him for investigation by the judges or director and report in writing. He must furnish to each person released on probation, parole, or community supervision under his supervision a written statement of the conditions of probation, parole, or community supervision and must instruct him regarding them. He must keep informed concerning the conduct and condition of each person on probation, parole, or community supervision under his supervision by visiting, requiring reports, and in other ways, and must report in writing as often as the court or director may require. He must use practicable and suitable methods that are consistent with evidence-based practices to aid and encourage persons on probation, parole, or community supervision to bring about improvement in their conduct and condition and to reduce the risk of recidivism for the offenders under his supervision. A probation agent must keep detailed records of his work, make reports in writing, and perform other duties as the director may require.

(B) A probation agent has, in the execution of his duties, the power to issue an arrest warrant or a citation charging a violation of conditions of supervision, the powers of arrest, and, to the extent necessary, the same right to execute process given by law to sheriffs. A probation agent has the power and authority to enforce the criminal laws of the State. In the performance of his duties of probation, parole, community supervision, and investigation, he is regarded as the official representative of the court, the department, and the board.

(C) A probation agent must conduct an actuarial assessment of offender risks and needs, including criminal risk factors and specific needs of each individual, under the supervision of the department, which shall be used to make objectively based decisions that are consistent with evidence-based practices on the type of supervision and services necessary. The actuarial assessment tool shall include screening and comprehensive versions. The screening version shall be used as a triage tool to determine offenders who require the comprehensive version. The director also shall require each agent to receive annual training on evidence-based practices and criminal risks factors and how to target these factors to reduce recidivism.

(D) A probation agent, in consultation with his supervisor, shall identify each individual under the supervision of the department, with a term of supervision of more than one year, and shall calculate and award compliance credits as provided in this section. Credits may be earned from the first day of supervision on a thirty-day basis, but shall not be applied until after each thirty-day period of supervision has been completed. Compliance credits may be denied for noncompliance on a thirty-day basis as determined by the department. The denial of nonearned compliance credits is a final decision of the department and is not subject to appeal. An individual may earn up to twenty days of compliance credits for each thirty-day period in which he has fulfilled all of the conditions of his supervision, has no new arrests, and has made all scheduled payments of his financial obligations.

(E) Any portion of the earned compliance credits are subject to be revoked by the department if an individual violates a condition of supervision during a subsequent thirty-day period.

(F) The department shall provide annually to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee the number of offenders who qualify for compliance credits and the amount of credits each has earned within a fiscal year.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-578; 1952 Code Section 55-578; 1942 Code Section 1038-9; 1942 (42) 1456; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 9; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 11; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 470; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 46; 2000 Act No. 352, Section 1; 2000 Act No. 396, Section 7; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 50, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-290. Information received by probation agents privileged.

All information and data obtained in the discharge of his official duty by a probation agent is privileged information, is not receivable as evidence in a court, and may not be disclosed directly or indirectly to anyone other than the judge or others entitled under this chapter to receive reports unless ordered by the court or the director.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-579; 1952 Code Section 55-579; 1942 Code Section 1038-14; 1942 (42) 1456; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 10; 1991 Act No. 134, 12; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 471.

SECTION 24-21-300. Issuance of citation to person released pursuant to Offender Management Systems Act for violation of release terms.

At any time during a period of supervision, a probation agent, instead of issuing a warrant, may issue a written citation and affidavit setting forth that the probationer, parolee, or community supervision releasee, or a person released or furloughed under the Offender Management Systems Act in the agent's judgment violates the conditions of his release or suspended sentence. The citation must be directed to the probationer, the parolee, the community supervision releasee, or the person released or furloughed, and must require him to appear at a specified time, date, and court or other place, and must state the charges. The citation must set forth the person's rights and contain a statement that a hearing will be held in his absence if he fails to appear and that he may be imprisoned as a result of his absence. The citation may be served by a law enforcement officer upon the request of a probation agent. A certificate of service is sufficient proof of service. The issuance of a citation or warrant during the period of supervision gives jurisdiction to the court and the board at any hearing on the violation.

HISTORY: 1988 Act No. 478; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 47.

ARTICLE 5.

PROBATION

SECTION 24-21-410. Power to suspend sentence and impose probation; exceptions; search and seizure.

After conviction or plea for any offense, except a crime punishable by death or life imprisonment, the judge of a court of record with criminal jurisdiction at the time of sentence may suspend the imposition or the execution of a sentence and place the defendant on probation or may impose a fine and also place the defendant on probation. Probation is a form of clemency. Before a defendant may be placed on probation, he must agree in writing to be subject to a search or seizure, without a search warrant, based on reasonable suspicions, of the defendant's person, any vehicle the defendant owns or is driving, and any of the defendant's possessions by:

(1) any probation agent employed by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; or

(2) any other law enforcement officer.

A defendant may not be placed on probation by the court if he fails to comply with this provision and instead must be required to serve the suspended portion of the defendant's sentence. However, a defendant who was convicted of or pled guilty or nolo contendere to a Class C misdemeanor or an unclassified misdemeanor that carries a term of imprisonment of not more than one year may not include the requirement that the defendant agree to be subject to search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the defendant's person, any vehicle the defendant owns or is driving, or any of the defendant's possessions.

Immediately before each search or seizure pursuant to this section, the law enforcement officer seeking to conduct the search or seizure must verify with the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services or by any other means available to the officer that the individual upon whom the search or seizure will be conducted is currently on parole. A law enforcement officer conducting a search or seizure without a warrant pursuant to this section shall report to the law enforcement agency that employs him all of these searches or seizures, which shall include the name, address, age, gender, and race or ethnicity of the person that is the subject of the search or seizure. The law enforcement agency shall submit this information at the end of each month to the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services for review of abuse. A finding of abuse of the use of searches or seizures without a search warrant must be reported by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services to the State Law Enforcement Division for investigation. If the law enforcement officer fails to report each search or seizure pursuant to this section, he is subject to discipline pursuant to the employing agency's policies and procedures.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-591; 1952 Code Section 55-591; 1942 Code Section 1038-1; 1942 (42) 1456; 1996 Act No. 341, Section 1; 2010 Act No. 151, Section 9, eff April 28, 2010.

SECTION 24-21-420. Report of probation agent on offense and defendant.

When directed by the court, the probation agent must fully investigate and report to the court in writing the circumstances of the offense and the criminal record, social history, and present condition of the defendant including, whenever practicable, the findings of a physical and mental examination of the defendant. When the services of a probation agent are available to the court, no defendant charged with a felony and, unless the court shall direct otherwise in individual cases, no other defendant may be placed on probation or released under suspension of sentence until the report of such investigation has been presented to and considered by the court.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-592; 1952 Code Section 55-592; 1942 Code Section 1038-2; 1942 (42) 1456; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 13.

SECTION 24-21-430. Conditions of probation.

The court may impose by order duly entered and may at any time modify the conditions of probation and may include among them any of the following or any other condition not prohibited in this section; however, the conditions imposed must include the requirement that the probationer must permit the search or seizure, without a search warrant, based on reasonable suspicions, of the probationer's person, any vehicle the probationer owns or is driving, and any of the probationer's possessions by:

(1) any probation agent employed by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; or

(2) any other law enforcement officer, but the conditions imposed upon a probationer who was convicted of or pled guilty or nolo contendere to a Class C misdemeanor or an unclassified misdemeanor that carries a term of imprisonment of not more than one year may not include the requirement that the probationer agree to be subject to search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the probationer's person, any vehicle the probationer owns or is driving, or any of the probationer's possessions.

By enacting this provision, the General Assembly intends to provide law enforcement with a means of reducing recidivism and does not authorize law enforcement officers to conduct searches for the sole purpose of harassment. Immediately before each search or seizure pursuant to this section, the law enforcement officer seeking to conduct the search or seizure must verify with the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services or by any other means available to the officer that the individual upon whom the search or seizure will be conducted is currently on probation. A law enforcement officer conducting a search or seizure without a warrant pursuant to this section shall report to the law enforcement agency that employs him all of these searches or seizures, which shall include the name, address, age, gender, and race or ethnicity of the person that is the subject of the search or seizure. The law enforcement agency shall submit this information at the end of each month to the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services for review of abuse. A finding of abuse of the use of searches or seizures without a search warrant must be reported by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services to the State Law Enforcement Division for investigation. If the law enforcement officer fails to report each search or seizure pursuant to this section, he is subject to discipline pursuant to the employing agency's policies and procedures.

To effectively supervise probationers, the director shall develop policies and procedures for imposing conditions of supervision on probationers. These conditions may enhance but must not diminish court imposed conditions.

The probationer shall:

(1) refrain from the violations of any state or federal penal laws;

(2) avoid injurious or vicious habits;

(3) avoid persons or places of disreputable or harmful character;

(4) permit the probation agent to visit at his home or elsewhere;

(5) work faithfully at suitable employment as far as possible;

(6) pay a fine in one or several sums as directed by the court;

(7) perform public service work as directed by the court;

(8) submit to a urinalysis or a blood test or both upon request of the probation agent;

(9) submit to curfew restrictions;

(10) submit to house arrest which is confinement in a residence for a period of twenty-four hours a day, with only those exceptions as the court may expressly grant in its discretion;

(11) submit to intensive surveillance which may include surveillance by electronic means;

(12) support his dependents; and

(13) follow the probation agent's instructions and advice regarding recreational and social activities.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-593; 1952 Code Section 55-593; 1942 Code Section 1038-3; 1942 (42) 1456; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 6; 1987 Act No. 31, Section 1; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 14; 1996 Act No. 341, Section 2; 2010 Act No. 151, Section 10, eff April 28, 2010.

SECTION 24-21-440. Period of probation.

The period of probation or suspension of sentence shall not exceed a period of five years and shall be determined by the judge of the court and may be continued or extended within the above limit.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-594; 1952 Code Section 55-594; 1942 Code Section 1038-4; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 15.

SECTION 24-21-450. Arrest for violation of terms of probation; bond.

At any time during the period of probation or suspension of sentence the court, or the court within the venue of which the violation occurs, or the probation agent may issue or cause the issuing of a warrant and cause the defendant to be arrested for violating any of the conditions of probation or suspension of sentence. Any police officer or other agent with power of arrest, upon the request of the probation agent, may arrest a probationer. In case of an arrest, the arresting officer or agent must have a written warrant from the probation agent setting forth that the probationer has, in his judgment, violated the conditions of probation, and such statement shall be warrant for the detention of such probationer in the county jail or other appropriate place of detention, until such probationer can be brought before the judge of the court or of the court within the venue of which the violation occurs. Such probation agent must forthwith report such arrest and detention to the judge of the court, or of the court within the venue of which the violation occurs, and submit in writing a report showing in what manner the probationer has violated his probation. Provided, that any person arrested for the violation of the terms of probation must be entitled to be released on bond pending a hearing, and such bond shall be granted and the amount thereof determined by a magistrate in the county where the probationer is confined or by the magistrate in whose jurisdiction the alleged violation of probation occurred.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-595; 1952 Code Section 55-595; 1942 Code Section 1038-4; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1955 (49) 72; 1959 (51) 320; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 16.

SECTION 24-21-460. Action of court in case of violation of terms of probation.

Upon such arrest the court, or the court within the venue of which the violation occurs, shall cause the defendant to be brought before it and may revoke the probation or suspension of sentence and shall proceed to deal with the case as if there had been no probation or suspension of sentence except that the circuit judge before whom such defendant may be so brought shall have the right, in his discretion, to require the defendant to serve all or a portion only of the sentence imposed. Should only a portion of the sentence imposed be put into effect, the remainder of such sentence shall remain in full force and effect and the defendant may again, from time to time, be brought before the circuit court so long as all of his sentence has not been served and the period of probation has not expired.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-596; 1952 Code Section 55-596; 1942 Code Section 1038-4; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1959 (51) 320.

SECTION 24-21-480. Restitution Center program; distribution of offenders' salaries.

The judge may suspend a sentence for a defendant convicted of a nonviolent offense, as defined in Section 16-1-70, for which imprisonment of more than ninety days may be imposed, or as a revocation of probation, and may place the offender in a restitution center as a condition of probation. The board may place a prisoner in a restitution center as a condition of parole. The department, on the first day of each month, shall present to the general sessions court a report detailing the availability of bed space in the restitution center program. The restitution center is a program under the jurisdiction of the department.

The offender must have paid employment and/or be required to perform public service employment up to a total of fifty hours per week.

The offender must deliver his salary to the restitution center staff who must distribute it in the following manner:

(1) restitution to the victim or payment to the account established pursuant to the Victims of Crime Act of 1984, Public Law 98-473, Title II, Chapter XIV, Section 1404, as ordered by the court;

(2) payment of child support or alimony or other sums as ordered by a court;

(3) payment of any fines or court fees due;

(4) payment of a daily fee for housing and food. This fee may be set by the department with the approval of the State Budget and Control Board. The fee must be based on the offender's ability to pay not to exceed the actual costs. This fee must be deposited by the department with the State Treasurer for credit to the same account as funds collected under Sections 14-1-210 through 14-1-230;

(5) payment of any costs incurred while in the restitution center;

(6) if available, fifteen dollars per week for personal items.

The remainder must be deposited and given to the offender upon his discharge.

The offender must be in the restitution center for not more than six months, nor less than three months; provided, however, in those cases where the maximum term is less than one year the offender must be in the restitution center for not more than ninety days nor less than forty-five days.

Upon release from the restitution center, the offender must be placed on probation for a term as ordered by the court.

Failure to comply with program requirements may result in a request to the court to revoke the suspended sentence.

No person must be made ineligible for this program by reason of gender.

HISTORY: 1986 Act No. 462, Section 5; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 12; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 17; 2008 Act No. 353, Section 2, Pt 15A, eff July 1, 2009.

SECTION 24-21-485. Authority of Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services with respect to establishment and maintenance of restitution centers.

In order for the department to establish and maintain restitution centers, the director may:

(1) develop policies and procedures for the operation of restitution centers;

(2) fund other management options advantageous to the State including, but not limited to, contracting with public or nonpublic entities for management of restitution centers;

(3) lease buildings;

(4) develop standards for disciplinary rules to be imposed on residents of restitution centers;

(5) develop standards for the granting of emergency furloughs to participants.

HISTORY: 1986 Act No. 462, Section 5; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 13; 1993 Act No. 181,Section 472.

SECTION 24-21-490. Collection and distribution of restitution.

(A) The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services shall collect and distribute restitution on a monthly basis from all offenders under probationary and intensive probationary supervision.

(B) Notwithstanding Section 14-17-725, the department shall assess a collection fee of twenty percent of each restitution program and deposit this collection fee into a separate account. The department shall maintain individual restitution accounts that reflect each transaction and the amount paid, the collection fee, and the unpaid balance of the account. A summary of these accounts must be reported to the Governor's Office, the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House, the Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, and the Chairman of the Senate Corrections and Penology Committee every six months following the enactment of this section.

(C) The department may retain the collection fees described in subsection (B) and expend the fees for the purpose of collecting and distributing restitution. Unexpended funds at the end of each fiscal year may be retained by the department and carried forward for use for the same purpose by the department.

(D) For financial obligations collected by the department pursuant to administrative monitoring requirements, payments shall be distributed by the department proportionately to pay restitution and fees based on the ratio of each category to the total financial obligation owed. Fines shall continue to be paid and collected pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 17, Title 14.

HISTORY: 1996 Act No. 437, Section 5; 2002 Act No. 356, Section 1, Pt IV.C; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 54, eff January 1, 2011.

ARTICLE 6.

COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY CONTROL SYSTEM

SECTION 24-21-510. Development and operation of system; basic elements.

The department shall develop and operate a comprehensive community control system if the General Assembly appropriates sufficient funds. The system shall include community control centers and sentencing options as a condition of probation, and utilize all sentencing options set forth in Chapter 21 of Title 24.

HISTORY: 1993 Act No. 164, Part II, Section 24A; 1995 Act No. 145, Part II, Section 52A.

SECTION 24-21-540. Community Control Centers for higher risk offenders; guidelines for placement.

The department shall develop and operate Community Control Centers for higher risk offenders, if the General Assembly appropriates funds to operate the centers. If the department has recommended the placement, offenders may be placed in a center for not less than thirty days nor more than six months by a judge as a condition of probation or as an alternative to probation revocation, or by the board as a condition of parole or as an alternative to parole revocation. An offender may not be placed in the center for more than six months on the same crime. There must not be consecutive sentencing to a Community Control Center.

HISTORY: 1993 Act No. 164, Part II, Section 24A.

SECTION 24-21-550. Probation terms involving fines, costs, assessments, or restitution.

A probation term ordered to end upon the payment of fines, court costs, assessments, and restitution must continue until the clerk of court certifies in writing that all monies have been paid, or the probation term has expired, or the expiration of probation has been changed by a subsequent order.

HISTORY: 1993 Act No. 164, Part II, Section 24A.

SECTION 24-21-560. Community supervision program; eligibility; time periods, supervision, and determination of completion; violations; revocation; notification of release to community supervision.

(A) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, except in a case in which the death penalty or a term of life imprisonment is imposed, any sentence for a "no parole offense" as defined in Section 24-13-100 must include any term of incarceration and completion of a community supervision program operated by the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services. No prisoner who is serving a sentence for a "no parole offense" is eligible to participate in a community supervision program until he has served the minimum period of incarceration as set forth in Section 24-13-150. Nothing in this section may be construed to allow a prisoner convicted of murder or a prisoner prohibited from early release, discharge, or work release by any other provision of law to be eligible for early release, discharge, or work release.

(B) A community supervision program operated by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services must last no more than two continuous years. The period of time a prisoner is required to participate in a community supervision program and the individual terms and conditions of a prisoner's participation shall be at the discretion of the department based upon guidelines developed by the director; however, the conditions of participation must include the requirement that the offender must permit the search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the offender's person, any vehicle the offender owns or is driving, and any of the offender's possessions by:

(1) any probation agent employed by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; or

(2) any other law enforcement officer, but the conditions for participation for an offender who was convicted of or pled guilty or nolo contendere to a Class C misdemeanor or an unclassified misdemeanor that carries a term of imprisonment of not more than one year may not include the requirement that the offender agree to be subject to search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the offender's person, any vehicle the offender owns or is driving, or any of the offender's possessions.

By enacting this provision, the General Assembly intends to provide law enforcement with a means of reducing recidivism and does not authorize law enforcement officers to conduct searches for the sole purpose of harassment. Immediately before each search or seizure pursuant to this subsection, the law enforcement officer seeking to conduct the search or seizure must verify with the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services or by any other means available to the officer that the individual upon whom the search or seizure will be conducted is currently in a community supervision program. A law enforcement officer conducting a search or seizure without a warrant pursuant to this subsection shall report to the law enforcement agency that employs him all of these searches or seizures, which shall include the name, address, age, gender, and race or ethnicity of the person that is the subject of the search or seizure. The law enforcement agency shall submit this information at the end of each month to the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services for review of abuse. A finding of abuse of the use of searches or seizures without a search warrant must be reported by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services to the State Law Enforcement Division for investigation. If the law enforcement officer fails to report each search or seizure pursuant to this subsection, he is subject to discipline pursuant to the employing agency's policies and procedures.

A prisoner participating in a community supervision program must be supervised by a probation agent of the department. The department must determine when a prisoner completes a community supervision program, violates a term of community supervision, fails to participate in a program satisfactorily, or whether a prisoner should appear before the court for revocation of the community supervision program.

(C) If the department determines that a prisoner has violated a term of the community supervision program and the community supervision should be revoked, a probation agent must initiate a proceeding in General Sessions Court. The proceeding must be initiated pursuant to a warrant or a citation issued by a probation agent setting forth the violations of the community supervision program. The court shall determine whether:

(1) the terms of the community supervision program are fair and reasonable;

(2) the prisoner has complied with the terms of the community supervision program;

(3) the prisoner should continue in the community supervision program under the current terms;

(4) the prisoner should continue in the community supervision program under other terms and conditions as the court considers appropriate;

(5) the prisoner has wilfully violated a term of the community supervision program.

If the court determines that a prisoner has wilfully violated a term or condition of the community supervision program, the court may impose any other terms or conditions considered appropriate and may continue the prisoner on community supervision, or the court may revoke the prisoner's community supervision and impose a sentence of up to one year for violation of the community supervision program. A prisoner who is incarcerated for revocation of the community supervision program is not eligible to earn any type of credits which would reduce the sentence for violation of the community supervision program.

(D) If a prisoner's community supervision is revoked by the court and the court imposes a period of incarceration for the revocation, the prisoner also must complete a community supervision program of up to two years as determined by the department pursuant to subsection (B) when he is released from incarceration.

A prisoner who is sentenced for successive revocations of the community supervision program may be required to serve terms of incarceration for successive revocations, as provided in Section 24-21-560(C), and may be required to serve additional periods of community supervision for successive revocations, as provided in Section 24-21-560(D). The maximum aggregate amount of time a prisoner may be required to serve when sentenced for successive revocations may not exceed an amount of time equal to the length of incarceration imposed limited by the amount of time remaining on the original "no parole offense". The prisoner must not be incarcerated for a period longer than the original sentence. The original term of incarceration does not include any portion of a suspended sentence.

If a prisoner's community supervision is revoked due to a conviction for another offense, the prisoner must complete a community supervision program of up to two continuous years as determined by the department after the prisoner has completed the service of the sentence for the community supervision revocation and any other term of imprisonment which may have been imposed for the criminal offense, except when the subsequent sentence is death or life imprisonment.

(E) A prisoner who successfully completes a community supervision program pursuant to this section has satisfied his sentence and must be discharged from his sentence.

(F) The Department of Corrections must notify the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services of the projected release date of any inmate serving a sentence for a "no parole offense" one hundred eighty days in advance of his release to community supervision. For an offender sentenced to one hundred eighty days or less, the Department of Corrections immediately must notify the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services.

(G) Victims registered pursuant to Article 15, Chapter 3, Title 16 and the sheriff's office in the county where a prisoner sentenced for a "no parole offense" is to be released must be notified by the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services when the prisoner is released to a community supervision program.

HISTORY: 1995 Act No. 83, Section 1; 2010 Act No. 151, Section 11, eff April 28, 2010; 2010 Act No. 237, Section 94, eff June 11, 2010.

ARTICLE 7.

PAROLE; RELEASE FOR GOOD CONDUCT

SECTION 24-21-610. Eligibility for parole.

In all cases cognizable under this chapter the Board may, upon ten days' written notice to the solicitor and judge who participated in the trial of any prisoner, parole a prisoner convicted of a crime and imprisoned in the state penitentiary, in any jail, or upon the public works of any county who if:

(1) sentenced for not more than thirty years has served at least one-third of the term;

(2) sentenced to life imprisonment or imprisonment for any period in excess of thirty years, has served at least ten years.

If after January 1, 1984, the Board finds that the statewide case classification system provided for in Chapter 23 of this title has been implemented, that an intensive supervision program for parolees who require more than average supervision has been implemented, that a system for the periodic review of all parole cases in order to assess the adequacy of supervisory controls and of parolee participation in rehabilitative programs has been implemented, and that a system of contracted rehabilitative services for parolees is being furnished by public and private agencies, then in all cases cognizable under this chapter the Board may, upon ten days' written notice to the solicitor and judge who participated in the trial of any prisoner, to the victim or victims, if any, of the crime, and to the sheriff of the county where the prisoner resides or will reside, parole a prisoner who if sentenced for a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60, has served at least one-third of the term or the mandatory minimum portion of sentence, whichever is longer. For any other crime the prisoner shall have served at least one-fourth of the term of a sentence or if sentenced to life imprisonment or imprisonment for any period in excess of forty years, has served at least ten years.

The provisions of this section do not affect the parole ineligibility provisions for murder, armed robbery, and drug trafficking as set forth respectively in Sections 16-3-20 and 16-11-330, and subsection (e) of Section 44-53-370.

In computing parole eligibility, no deduction of time may be allowed in any case for good behavior, but after June 30, 1981, there must be deductions of time in all cases for earned work credits, notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 16-3-20, 16-11-330, and 24-13-230.

Notwithstanding the provisions of this section, the Board may parole any prisoner not sooner than one year prior to the prescribed date of parole eligibility when, based on medical information furnished to it, the Board determines that the physical condition of the prisoner concerned is so serious that he would not be reasonably expected to live for more than one year. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section or of law, no prisoner who has served a total of ten consecutive years or more in prison may be paroled until the Board has first received a report as to his mental condition and his ability to adjust to life outside the prison from a duly qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-611; 1952 Code Section 55-611; 1942 Code Section 1038-10; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1962 (52) 1887; 1963 (53) 241; 1972 (57) 2528; 1981 Act No. 100, Section 9; 1984 Act No. 482, Section 2; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 35.

SECTION 24-21-615. Review of case of prisoner convicted of capital offense by Parole Board restricted.

The board may not review the case of a prisoner convicted of a capital offense for the purpose of determining whether the person is entitled to any of the benefits provided in this chapter during the month of December of each year.

HISTORY: 1994 Act No. 286, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-620. Review by Board of prisoner's case after prisoner has served one fourth of sentence.

Within the ninety-day period preceding a prisoner having served one-fourth of his sentence, the board, either acting in a three-member panel or meeting as a full board, shall review the case, regardless of whether or not any application has been made therefor, for the purpose of determining whether or not such prisoner is entitled to any of the benefits provided for in this chapter; provided, that in cases of prisoners in confinement due to convictions for nonviolent crimes, an administrative hearing officer may be appointed by the director to review the case who must submit to the full board written findings of fact and recommendations which shall be the basis for a determination by the board. Upon an affirmative determination, the prisoner must be granted a provisional parole or parole. Upon a negative determination, the prisoner's case shall be reviewed every twelve months thereafter for the purpose of such determination.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-611.1; 1952 Code Section 55-611.1; 1942 Code Section 1038-10; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1981 Act No. 100, Section 10; 1991 Act No. 134,Section 18; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 473.

SECTION 24-21-630. Effect of time served while awaiting trial upon determination of time required to be served for eligibility for parole.

For the purpose of determining the time required to be served by a prisoner before he shall be eligible to be considered for parole, notwithstanding any other provision of law, all prisoners shall be given benefit for time served in prison in excess of three months while awaiting trial or between trials.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-611.2; 1968 (55) 2717.

SECTION 24-21-635. Earned work credits.

For the purpose of determining the time required to be served by a prisoner before he shall be eligible to be considered for parole, notwithstanding any other provision of law, all prisoners shall be given benefit of earned work credits awarded pursuant to Section 24-13-230.

HISTORY: 1978 Act No. 496, Section 17; 1981 Act No. 100, Section 11.

SECTION 24-21-640. Circumstances warranting parole; search and seizure; criteria; reports of parolees; records subject to Freedom of Information Act.

The board must carefully consider the record of the prisoner before, during, and after imprisonment, and no such prisoner may be paroled until it appears to the satisfaction of the board: that the prisoner has shown a disposition to reform; that in the future he will probably obey the law and lead a correct life; that by his conduct he has merited a lessening of the rigors of his imprisonment; that the interest of society will not be impaired thereby; and that suitable employment has been secured for him.

Before an inmate may be released on parole, he must agree in writing to be subject to search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the inmate's person, any vehicle the inmate owns or is driving, and any of the inmate's possessions by:

(1) any probation agent employed by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; or

(2) any other law enforcement officer.

An inmate may not be granted parole release by the board if he fails to comply with this provision. However, an inmate who was convicted of or pled guilty or nolo contendere to a Class C misdemeanor or an unclassified misdemeanor that carries a term of imprisonment of not more than one year may not include the requirement that the inmate agree to be subject to search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the inmate's person, any vehicle the inmate owns or is driving, or any of the inmate's possessions.

Immediately before each search or seizure pursuant to this section, the law enforcement officer seeking to conduct the search or seizure must verify with the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services or by any other means available to the officer that the individual upon whom the search or seizure will be conducted is currently on parole. A law enforcement officer conducting a search or seizure without a warrant pursuant to this section shall report to the law enforcement agency that employs him all of these searches or seizures, which shall include the name, address, age, gender, and race or ethnicity of the person that is the subject of the search or seizure. The law enforcement agency shall submit this information at the end of each month to the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services for review of abuse. A finding of abuse of the use of searches or seizures without a search warrant must be reported by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services to the State Law Enforcement Division for investigation. If the law enforcement officer fails to report each search or seizure pursuant to this section, he is subject to discipline pursuant to the employing agency's policies and procedures.

The board must establish written, specific criteria for the granting of parole and provisional parole. This criteria must reflect all of the aspects of this section and include a review of a prisoner's disciplinary and other records. The criteria must be made available to all prisoners at the time of their incarceration and the general public. The paroled prisoner must, as often as may be required, render a written report to the board giving that information as may be required by the board which must be confirmed by the person in whose employment the prisoner may be at the time. The board must not grant parole nor is parole authorized to any prisoner serving a sentence for a second or subsequent conviction, following a separate sentencing for a prior conviction, for violent crimes as defined in Section 16-1-60. Provided that where more than one included offense shall be committed within a one-day period or pursuant to one continuous course of conduct, such multiple offenses must be treated for purposes of this section as one offense.

Any part or all of a prisoner's in-prison disciplinary records and, with the prisoner's consent, records involving all awards, honors, earned work credits and educational credits, are subject to the Freedom of Information Act as contained in Chapter 4, Title 30.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 12; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 30; 1962 Code Section 55-612; 1952 Code Section 55-612; 1942 Code Section 1038-11; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1981 Act No. 100, Section 12; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 30; 1990 Act No. 510, Section 1; 2010 Act No. 151, Section 12, eff April 28, 2010.

SECTION 24-21-645. Parole and provisional parole orders; search and seizure; review schedule following parole denial of prisoners confined for violent crimes.

(A) The board may issue an order authorizing the parole which must be signed either by a majority of its members or by all three members meeting as a parole panel on the case ninety days prior to the effective date of the parole; however, at least two-thirds of the members of the board must authorize and sign orders authorizing parole for persons convicted of a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60. A provisional parole order shall include the terms and conditions, if any, to be met by the prisoner during the provisional period and terms and conditions, if any, to be met upon parole.

(B) The conditions of parole must include the requirement that the parolee must permit the search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the parolee's person, any vehicle the parolee owns or is driving, and any of the parolee's possessions by:

(1) any probation agent employed by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services; or

(2) any other law enforcement officer.

However, the conditions of parole for a parolee who was convicted of or pled guilty or nolo contendere to a Class C misdemeanor or an unclassified misdemeanor that carries a term of imprisonment of not more than one year may not include the requirement that the parolee agree to be subject to search or seizure, without a search warrant, with or without cause, of the parolee's person, any vehicle the parolee owns or is driving, or any of the parolee's possessions.

(C) By enacting this provision, the General Assembly intends to provide law enforcement with a means of reducing recidivism and does not authorize law enforcement officers to conduct searches for the sole purpose of harassment. Immediately before each search or seizure pursuant to this section, the law enforcement officer seeking to conduct the search or seizure must verify with the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services or by any other means available to the officer that the individual upon whom the search or seizure will be conducted is currently on parole. A law enforcement officer conducting a search or seizure without a warrant pursuant to this section shall report to the law enforcement agency that employs him all of these searches or seizures, which shall include the name, address, age, gender, and race or ethnicity of the person that is the subject of the search or seizure. The law enforcement agency shall submit this information at the end of each month to the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services for review of abuse. A finding of abuse of the use of searches or seizures without a search warrant must be reported by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services to the State Law Enforcement Division for investigation. If the law enforcement officer fails to report each search or seizure pursuant to this section, he is subject to discipline pursuant to the employing agency's policies and procedures.

(D) Upon satisfactory completion of the provisional period, the director or one lawfully acting for him must issue an order which, if accepted by the prisoner, shall provide for his release from custody. However, upon a negative determination of parole, prisoners in confinement for a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60 must have their cases reviewed every two years for the purpose of a determination of parole, except that prisoners who are eligible for parole pursuant to Section 16-25-90, and who are subsequently denied parole must have their cases reviewed every twelve months for the purpose of a determination of parole. This subsection applies retroactively to a prisoner who has had a parole hearing pursuant to Section 16-25-90 prior to the effective date of this act.

HISTORY: 1981 Act. No. 100, Section 13; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 31; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 19; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 474; 1997 Act No. 120, Section 4; 2010 Act No. 151, Section 13, eff April 28, 2010; 2010 Act No. 273, Section 58, eff January 1, 2011.

SECTION 24-21-650. Order of parole.

The board shall issue an order authorizing the parole which must be signed by at least a majority of its members with terms and conditions, if any, but at least two-thirds of the members of the board must sign orders authorizing parole for persons convicted of a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60. The director, or one lawfully acting for him, then must issue a parole order which, if accepted by the prisoner, provides for his release from custody. Upon a negative determination of parole, prisoners in confinement for a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60 must have their cases reviewed every two years for the purpose of a determination of parole.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-613; 1952 Code Section 55-613; 1942 Code Section 1038-11; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1977 Act No. 110, Section 1; 1986 Act No. 462, Section 32; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 14; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 1993 Act No. 181, Section 475.

SECTION 24-21-660. Effect of parole.

Any prisoner who has been paroled is subject during the remainder of his original term of imprisonment, up to the maximum, to the conditions and restrictions imposed in the order of parole or by law imposed. Every such paroled prisoner must remain in the jurisdiction of the board and may at any time on the order of the board, be imprisoned as and where therein designated.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-614; 1952 Code Section 55-614; 1942 Code Section 1038-11; 1942 (42) 1456; 1949 (46) 311; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 21.

SECTION 24-21-670. Term of parole.

Any prisoner who may be paroled under authority of this chapter shall continue on parole until the expiration of the maximum term or terms specified in his sentence without deduction of such allowance for good conduct as may be provided for by law.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-615; 1952 Code Section 55-615; 1942 Code Section 1038-12; 1942 (42) 1456.

SECTION 24-21-680. Violation of parole.

Upon failure of any prisoner released on parole under the provisions of this chapter to do or refrain from doing any of the things set forth and required to be done by and under the terms of his parole, the parole agent must issue a warrant or citation charging the violation of parole, and a final determination must be made by the board as to whether the prisoner's parole should be revoked and whether he should be required to serve any part of the remaining unserved sentence. But such prisoner must be eligible to parole thereafter when and if the board thinks such parole would be proper. The board shall be the sole judge as to whether or not a parole has been violated and no appeal therefrom shall be allowed; provided, that any person arrested for violation of terms of parole may be released on bond, for good cause shown, pending final determination of the violation by the Probation, Parole and Pardon Board. No bond shall be granted except by the presiding or resident judge of the circuit wherein the prisoner is arrested, or, if there be no judge within such circuit, by the judge, presiding or resident, in an adjacent circuit, and the judge granting the bond shall determine the amount thereof.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-616; 1952 Code Section 55-616; 1942 Code Section 1038-11; 1942 (42) 1456; 1947 (45) 67; 1949 (46) 311; 1962 (52) 1887; 1965 (54) 306; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 22.

SECTION 24-21-690. Release after service of full time less good conduct deduction.

Any person who shall have served the term for which he has been sentenced less deductions allowed therefrom for good conduct shall, upon release, be treated as if he had served the entire term for which he was sentenced.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-617; 1952 Code Section 55-617; 1942 Code Section 1038-12; 1942 (42) 1456; 1955 (49) 475.

SECTION 24-21-700. Special parole of persons needing psychiatric care.

Any prisoner who is otherwise eligible for parole under the provisions of this article, except that his mental condition is deemed by the Probation, Pardon and Parole Board to be such that he should not be released from confinement may, subject to approval by the Veterans Administration, be released to the custody of the Veterans Administration or to a committee appointed to commit such prisoner to a Veterans Administration Hospital. Such a special parole shall be granted in the sole discretion of the Board and, when so paroled, a prisoner shall be transferred directly from his place of confinement to a Veterans Administration Hospital which provides psychiatric care. When any prisoner paroled for psychiatric treatment is determined to be in a suitable condition to be released, he shall not be returned to penal custody except for a subsequent violation of the conditions of his parole.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-618; 1968 (55) 2696.

SECTION 24-21-710. Film, videotape, or other electronic information may be considered by board in parole determination.

(A) Film, videotape, or other electronic information that is both visual and aural, submitted pursuant to this section, must be considered by the Board of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services in making its determination of parole.

(B) Upon receipt of the notice required by law, the following people may submit electronic information:

(1) the victim of the crime for which the prisoner has been sentenced;

(2) the prosecuting solicitor's office; and

(3) the person whose parole is being considered.

(C) The person submitting the electronic information shall provide the Board of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services with the following:

(1) identification of each voice heard and each person seen;

(2) a visual or aural statement of the date the information was recorded; and

(3) the name of the person whose parole eligibility is being considered.

(D) If the film, videotape, or other electronic information is retained by the board, it may be submitted at subsequent parole hearings each time that the submitting person provides a written statement declaring that the information represents the present position of the person who is submitting the information.

(E) The Department of Corrections may install, maintain, and operate a two-way closed circuit television system in one or more correctional institutions of the department that confines persons eligible for parole. The Board of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services shall install, maintain, and operate closed circuit television systems at locations determined by the board and conduct parole hearings by means of a two-way closed circuit television system provided in this section. A victim of a crime must be allowed access to this system to appear before the board during a parole hearing.

(F) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit submission of information in other forms as provided by law.

(G) The director of the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services may develop written policies and procedures for parole hearings to be held pursuant to this section.

(H) The Board of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services is not required to install, maintain, or operate film, videotape, or other electronic equipment to record a victim's testimony to be presented to the board.

HISTORY: 1995 Act No. 57, Section 1; 2004 Act No. 263, Section 14.

SECTION 24-21-715. Parole for terminally ill, geriatric, or permanently disabled inmates.

(A) As contained in this section:

(1) "Terminally ill" means an inmate who, as determined by a licensed physician, has an incurable condition caused by illness or disease that was unknown at the time of sentencing or, since the time of sentencing, has progressed to render the inmate terminally ill, and that will likely produce death within two years, and that is so debilitating that the inmate does not pose a public safety risk.

(2) "Geriatric" means an inmate who is seventy years of age or older and suffers from chronic infirmity, illness, or disease related to aging, which has progressed so the inmate is incapacitated as determined by a licensed physician to the extent that the inmate does not pose a public safety risk.

(3) "Permanently incapacitated" means an inmate who no longer poses a public safety risk because of a medical condition that is not terminal but that renders him permanently and irreversibly incapacitated as determined by a licensed physician and which requires immediate and long term residential care.

(B) Notwithstanding another provision of law, only the full parole board, upon a petition filed by the Director of the Department of Corrections, may order the release of an inmate who is terminally ill, geriatric, permanently incapacitated, or any combination of these conditions.

(C) The parole order issued by the parole board pursuant to this section must include findings of fact that substantiate a legal and medical conclusion that the inmate is terminally ill, geriatric, permanently incapacitated, or a combination of these conditions, and does not pose a threat to society or himself. It also must contain the requirements for the inmate's supervision and conditions for his participation and removal.

(D) An inmate granted a parole pursuant to this section is under the supervision of the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services. The inmate must reside in an approved residence and abide by all conditions ordered by the parole board. The department is responsible for supervising an inmate's compliance with the conditions of the parole board's order as well as monitoring the inmate in accordance with the department's policies.

(E) The department shall retain jurisdiction for all matters relating to the parole granted pursuant to this section and conduct an annual review of the inmate's status to ensure that he remains eligible for parole pursuant to this section. If the department determines that the inmate is no longer eligible to participate in the parole set forth in this section, a probation agent must issue a warrant or citation charging a violation of parole and the board shall proceed pursuant to the provisions of Section 24-21-680.

HISTORY: 2010 Act No. 273, Section 55, eff January 1, 2011.

ARTICLE 11.

PARDONS; COMMUTATION OF DEATH SENTENCES

SECTION 24-21-910. Petitions for reprieve or commutation of death sentence; recommendation to governor.

The Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services Board shall consider all petitions for reprieves or the commutation of a sentence of death to life imprisonment which may be referred to it by the Governor and shall make its recommendations to the Governor regarding the petitions. The Governor may or may not adopt the recommendations but in case he does not he shall submit his reasons for not doing so to the General Assembly. The Governor may act on any petition without reference to the board.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-641; 1952 Code Section 55-641; 1942 Code Section 3436; 1932 Code Section 3436; Civ. C. '22 Section 978; Civ. C. '12 Section 889; 1906 (25) 14; 1949 (46) 49; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 17; 1995 Act No. 83, Section 48.

SECTION 24-21-920. Clemency in other cases.

In all other cases than those referred to in Section 24-21-910 the right of granting clemency shall be vested in the Board.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-642; 1952 Code Section 55-642; Const. Art. 4, Section 11.

SECTION 24-21-930. Order of pardon.

An order of pardon must be signed by at least two-thirds of the members of the board. Upon the issue of the order by the board, the director, or one lawfully acting for him, must issue a pardon order which provides for the restoration of the pardon applicant's civil rights.

HISTORY: 1962 Code Section 55-643; 1952 Code Section 55-643; 1949 (46) 311; 1988 Act No. 480, Section 15; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 23; 1993 Act No. 181, Section 476.

SECTION 24-21-940. Definitions.

A. "Pardon" means that an individual is fully pardoned from all the legal consequences of his crime and of his conviction, direct and collateral, including the punishment, whether of imprisonment, pecuniary penalty or whatever else the law has provided.

B. "Successful completion of supervision" as used in this article shall mean free of conviction of any type other than minor traffic offenses.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14.

SECTION 24-21-950. Guidelines for determining eligibility for pardon.

(A) The following guidelines must be utilized by the board when determining when an individual is eligible for pardon consideration.

(1) Probationers must be considered upon the request of the individual anytime after discharge from supervision.

(2) Persons discharged from a sentence without benefit of parole must be considered upon the request of the individual anytime after the date of discharge.

(3) Parolees must be considered for a pardon upon the request of the individual anytime after the successful completion of five years under supervision. Parolees successfully completing the maximum parole period, if less than five years, must be considered for pardon upon the request of the individual anytime after the date of discharge.

(4) An inmate must be considered for pardon before a parole eligibility date only when he can produce evidence comprising the most extraordinary circumstances.

(5) The victim of a crime or a member of a convicted person's family living within this State may petition for a pardon for a person who has completed supervision or has been discharged from a sentence.

(B) Persons discharged from a sentence without benefit of supervision must be considered upon the request of the individual anytime after the date of discharge.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14; 1988 Act No. 322, Section 1; 1995 Act No. 83,Section 49.

SECTION 24-21-960. Pardon application fee; re-application after denial.

(A) Each pardon application must be accompanied with a pardon application fee of one hundred dollars. The pardon application fee must be retained and applied by the department toward the pardon process.

(B) Any individual who has an application for pardon considered but denied, must wait one year from the date of denial before filing another pardon application and fee.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14; 1993 Act No. 164, Part II, Section 27A; 2008 Act No. 353, Section 2, Pt 15C, eff July 1, 2009.

SECTION 24-21-970. Pardon considered in cases of terminal illness.

Consideration shall be given to any inmate afflicted with a terminal illness where life expectancy is one year or less.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14.

SECTION 24-21-980. Pardon obtained through fraud.

Once delivered, a pardon cannot be revoked unless it was obtained through fraud. If a pardon is obtained through fraud, it is void.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14.

SECTION 24-21-990. Civil rights restored upon pardon.

A pardon shall fully restore all civil rights lost as a result of a conviction, which shall include the right to:

(1) register to vote;

(2) vote;

(3) serve on a jury;

(4) hold public office, except as provided in Section 16-13-210;

(5) testify without having the fact of his conviction introduced for impeachment purposes to the extent provided by Rule 609(c) of the South Carolina Rules of Evidence;

(6) not have his testimony excluded in a legal proceeding if convicted of perjury; and

(7) be licensed for any occupation requiring a license.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14; 1991 Act No. 134, Section 24; 1995 Act No. 104, Section 6.

SECTION 24-21-1000. Certificate of pardon.

For those applicants to be granted a pardon, a certificate of pardon shall be issued by the Board stating that the individual is absolved from all legal consequences of his crime and conviction, and that all of his civil rights are restored.

HISTORY: 1981 Act No. 100, Section 14.

ARTICLE 12.

INTERSTATE COMPACT FOR ADULT OFFENDER SUPERVISION

SECTION 24-21-1100. Short title.

This article may be cited as the "Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision".

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1105. Purpose.

The purpose of this compact and the Interstate Commission created under it, through means of joint and cooperative action among the compacting states, is to:

(1) promote public safety by providing adequate supervision in the community of adult offenders who are subject to the compact;

(2) provide a means for tracking offenders subject to supervision under this compact;

(3) provide a means of transferring supervision authority in an orderly and efficient manner;

(4) provide a means of returning offenders to the originating jurisdictions when necessary;

(5) provide a means for giving timely notice to victims of the location of offenders subject to supervision under this compact;

(6) distribute the costs, benefits, and obligations of this compact equitably among the compacting states;

(7) establish a system of uniform data collection for offenders subject to supervision under this compact and to allow access to information by authorized criminal justice officials;

(8) monitor compliance with rules established under this compact; and

(9) coordinate training and education regarding regulations relating to the interstate movement of offenders, for officials involved in this activity.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1110. Definitions.

As used in this compact, unless the context clearly requires a different construction:

(A) "Adult" means both individuals legally classified as adults and juveniles treated as adults by court order, statute, or operation of law.

(B) "By-laws" mean those by-laws established by the Interstate Commission for its governance, or for directing or controlling the Interstate Commission's actions or conduct.

(C) "Compact administrator" means the individual in each compacting state appointed to administer and manage the state's supervision and transfer of offenders subject to the terms of this compact and the rules adopted by the Interstate Commission.

(D) "Compacting state" means any state which has enacted the enabling legislation for this compact.

(E) "Commissioner" means the voting representative of each compacting state appointed pursuant to Section 24-21-1120 and this compact.

(F) "Interstate Commission" means the Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision.

(G) "Member" means the commissioner of a compacting state or designee, who must be a person officially connected with the commissioner.

(H) "Noncompacting state" means a state which has not enacted the enabling legislation for this compact.

(I) "Offender" means an adult placed under, or subject to supervision as the result of the commission of a criminal offense and released to the community under the jurisdiction of a court, paroling authority, corrections, or other criminal justice agency.

(J) "Person" means any individual, corporation, business enterprise, or other legal entity, either public or private.

(K) "Rules" means acts of the Interstate Commission, promulgated pursuant to Section 24-21-1160 of this compact, substantially affecting interested parties in addition to the Interstate Commission, which have the force and effect of law in the compacting states.

(L) "State" means a state of the United States, the District of Columbia, and any territorial possession of the United States.

(M) "State Council" means the resident members of the state council for Interstate Adult Offender Supervision created by each state under Section 24-21-1120.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1120. Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision; state council; creation; commissioners and noncommissioner members; quorum; meetings; Executive Committee.

(A) The compacting states hereby create the " Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision". The Interstate Commission shall be a body corporate and joint agency of the compacting states. The Interstate Commission shall have all the responsibilities, powers, and duties contained in this article, including the power to sue and be sued, and any additional powers as may be conferred upon it by subsequent action of the respective legislatures of the compacting states in accordance with the terms of this compact.

(B)(1) The Interstate Commission shall consist of commissioners selected and appointed by the compacting states. The Governor shall appoint as commissioner from the State of South Carolina the Director of the South Carolina Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services, or his designee. The commissioner, acting jointly with similar officers appointed in other states, shall promulgate rules and regulations necessary to effectively carry out the terms of this compact.

(2) The Director of the South Carolina Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services, or his designee, must serve as Compact Administrator for the State of South Carolina.

(3) The Director of the South Carolina Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services must establish a state council for Interstate Adult Offender Supervision. The membership of the state council must include at least one representative from the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of government, victims groups, and compact administrators. The state council shall act as an advisory body to the commissioner regarding the activities of the state's interstate compact office, engage in advocacy activities concerning the state's participation in interstate commission activities, and perform other duties determined by the commissioner.

(C) In addition to the commissioners who are the voting representatives of each state, the Interstate Commission shall include individuals who are not commissioners but who are members of interested organizations. The noncommissioner members must include a member of the National Organization of Governors, legislators, state chief justices, attorneys general, and crime victims. All noncommissioner members of the Interstate Commission shall be ex-officio nonvoting members. The Interstate Commission may provide in its by-laws for additional ex-officio nonvoting members as it considers necessary.

(D) Each compacting state represented at any meeting of the Interstate Commission is entitled to one vote. A majority of the compacting states shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, unless a larger quorum is required by the by-laws of the Interstate Commission.

(E) The Interstate Commission shall meet at least once each calendar year. The chairperson may call additional meetings and, upon the request of twenty-seven or more compacting states, shall call additional meetings. Public notice shall be given of all meetings and meetings shall be open to the public.

(F) The Interstate Commission shall establish an Executive Committee which shall include commission officers, members, and others as shall be determined by the by-laws. The Executive Committee shall have the power to act on behalf of the Interstate Commission during periods when the Interstate Commission is not in session, with the exception of making rules and amendments to the compact. The Executive Committee shall oversee the day-to-day activities managed by the Executive Director and Interstate Commission staff. It shall administer enforcement and compliance with the provisions of the compact, its by-laws, and as directed by the Interstate Commission and perform other duties as directed by the commission or set forth in the by-laws.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1130. Powers.

The Interstate Commission shall have the following powers:

(1) to adopt a seal and suitable by-laws governing the management and operation of the Interstate Commission;

(2) to promulgate rules which shall have the force and effect of statutory law and shall be binding in the compacting states to the extent and in the manner provided in this compact;

(3) to oversee, supervise, and coordinate the interstate movement of offenders subject to the terms of this compact and any by-laws adopted and rules promulgated by the compact commission;

(4) to enforce compliance with compact provisions, Interstate Commission rules, and bylaws using all necessary and proper means including, but not limited to, the use of the judicial process;

(5) to establish and maintain offices;

(6) to purchase and maintain insurance and bonds;

(7) to borrow, accept, or contract for services of personnel including, but not limited to, members and their staffs;

(8) to establish and appoint committees and hire staff which it considers necessary for the carrying out of its functions including, but not limited to, an executive committee as required by Section 24-21-1120(F) which shall have the power to act on behalf of the Interstate Commission in carrying out its powers and duties;

(9) to elect or appoint officers, attorneys, employees, agents, or consultants, and to fix their compensation, define their duties, and determine their qualifications, and to establish the Interstate Commission's personnel policies and programs relating to, among other things, conflicts of interest, rates of compensation, and qualifications of personnel;

(10) to accept donations and grants of money, equipment, supplies, materials, and services, and to receive, utilize, and dispose of them;

(11) to lease, purchase, accept contributions or donations of, or otherwise to own, hold, improve or use any real, personal, or mixed property;

(12) to sell, convey, mortgage, pledge, lease, exchange, abandon, or otherwise dispose of any real, personal, or mixed property;

(13) to establish a budget and make expenditures and levy dues as provided in Section 24-21-1180;

(14) to sue and be sued;

(15) to provide for dispute resolution among compacting states;

(16) to perform the functions as may be necessary or appropriate to achieve the purposes of this compact;

(17) to report annually to the legislatures, governors, judiciary, and state councils of the compacting states concerning the activities of the Interstate Commission during the preceding year. The reports shall also include any recommendations that may have been adopted by the Interstate Commission;

(18) to coordinate education, training, and public awareness regarding the interstate movement of offenders for officials involved in this activity; and

(19) to establish uniform standards for the reporting, collecting, and exchanging of data.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1140. Adoption of by-laws.

(A) The Interstate Commission, by a majority of the members, within twelve months of the first Interstate Commission meeting, shall adopt bylaws to govern its conduct as may be necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the compact including, but not limited to:

(1) establishing the fiscal year of the Interstate Commission;

(2) establishing an executive committee and other committees as may be necessary;

(3) providing reasonable standards and procedures for the establishment of committees and governing any general or specific delegation of any authority or function of the Interstate Commission;

(4) providing reasonable procedures for calling and conducting meetings of the Interstate Commission and ensuring reasonable notice of each meeting;

(5) establishing the titles and responsibilities of the officers of the Interstate Commission;

(6) providing reasonable standards and procedures for the establishment of the personnel policies and programs of the Interstate Commission. Notwithstanding any civil service or other similar laws of a compacting state, the bylaws shall exclusively govern the personnel policies and programs of the Interstate Commission;

(7) providing a mechanism for winding up the operations of the Interstate Commission and the equitable return of any surplus funds that may exist upon the termination of the compact after the payment reserving of all of its debts and obligations;

(8) providing transition rules for "start up" administration of the compact; and

(9) establishing standards and procedures for compliance and technical assistance in carrying out the compact.

(B)(1) The Interstate Commission shall, by a majority of the members, elect from among its members a chairperson and a vice chairperson, each of whom shall have the authorities and duties as may be specified in the bylaws. The chairperson or, in his or her absence or disability, the vice chairperson shall preside at all meetings of the Interstate Commission. The officers so elected shall serve without compensation or remuneration from the Interstate Commission; provided, that subject to the availability of budgeted funds, the officers shall be reimbursed for any actual and necessary costs and expenses incurred by them in the performance of their duties and responsibilities as officers of the Interstate Commission.

(2) The Interstate Commission shall, through its executive committee, appoint or retain an executive director for a period, upon terms and conditions and for compensation as the Interstate Commission considers appropriate. The executive director shall serve as secretary to the Interstate Commission and hire and supervise other staff as may be authorized by the Interstate Commission. The executive director is not a member of the Interstate Commission.

(C) The Interstate Commission shall maintain its corporate books and records in accordance with the by-laws.

(D)(1) The members, officers, executive director, and employees of the Interstate Commission are immune from suit and liability, either personally or in their official capacity, for any claim for damage to or loss of property or personal injury or other civil liability caused or arising out of any actual or alleged act, error, or omission that occurred within the scope of Interstate Commission employment, duties, or responsibilities; provided, that nothing in this subsection may be construed to protect any person from liability for any damage, loss, injury, or liability caused by the person's intentional, willful, or wanton misconduct.

(2) The Interstate Commission shall defend the commissioner of a compacting state, or his or her representatives or employees, or the Interstate Commission's representatives or employees, in any civil action seeking to impose liability, arising out of any actual or alleged act, error, or omission that occurred within the scope of Interstate Commission employment, duties, or responsibilities, or that the defendant had a reasonable basis for believing occurred within the scope of Interstate Commission employment, duties, or responsibilities; provided, that the actual or alleged act, error, or omission did not result from intentional wrongdoing on the part of that person.

(3) The Interstate Commission shall indemnify and hold the commissioner of a compacting state, the appointed designee or employees, or the Interstate Commission's representatives or employees harmless in the amount of any settlement or judgment obtained against the persons arising out of any actual or alleged act, error, or omission that occurred within the scope of Interstate Commission employment, duties, or responsibilities, or that the persons had a reasonable basis for believing occurred within the scope of Interstate Commission employment, duties, or responsibilities; provided, that the actual or alleged act, error, or omission did not result from gross negligence or intentional wrongdoing on the part of that person.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1150. Conduct of business; voting; public access to meetings and official records; closed meetings; minutes; interstate movement of offender data collection.

(A) The Interstate Commission shall meet and take such actions as are consistent with the provisions of this compact.

(B) Except as otherwise provided in this compact and unless a greater percentage is required by the bylaws, in order to constitute an act of the Interstate Commission, the act shall have been taken at a meeting of the Interstate Commission and shall have received an affirmative vote of a majority of the members present.

(C) Each member of the Interstate Commission shall have the right and power to cast a vote to which that compacting state is entitled and to participate in the business and affairs of the Interstate Commission. A member shall vote in person on behalf of the State and shall not delegate a vote to another member state. However, a state council may appoint another authorized representative, in the absence of the commissioner from that state, to cast a vote on behalf of the member state at a specified meeting. The bylaws may provide for members' participation in meetings by telephone or other means of telecommunication or electronic communication. Any voting conducted by telephone, or other means of telecommunication or electronic communication is subject to the same quorum requirements of meetings where members are present in person.

(D) The Interstate Commission shall meet at least once during each calendar year. The chairperson of the Interstate Commission may call additional meetings at any time and, upon the request of a majority of the members, shall call additional meetings.

(E) The Interstate Commission's bylaws shall establish conditions and procedures under which the Interstate Commission shall make its information and official records available to the public for inspection or copying. The Interstate Commission may exempt from disclosure any information or official records to the extent they would adversely affect personal privacy rights or proprietary interests. In promulgating these rules, the Interstate Commission may make available to law enforcement agencies records and information otherwise exempt from disclosure and may enter into agreements with law enforcement agencies to receive or exchange information or records subject to nondisclosure and confidentiality provisions.

(F) Public notice shall be given of all meetings and all meetings shall be open to the public, except as set forth in the rules or as otherwise provided in the compact. The Interstate Commission shall promulgate rules consistent with the principles contained in the "Government in Sunshine Act", 5 U.S.C. Section 552(b), as amended. The Interstate Commission and any of its committees may close a meeting to the public where it determines by two-thirds vote that an open meeting would be likely to:

(1) relate solely to the Interstate Commission's internal personnel practices and procedures;

(2) disclose matters specifically exempted from disclosure by statute;

(3) disclose trade secrets or commercial or financial information which is privileged or confidential;

(4) involve accusing a person of a crime or formally censuring a person;

(5) disclose information of a personal nature where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;

(6) disclose investigatory records compiled for law enforcement purposes;

(7) disclose information contained in or related to examination, operating or condition reports prepared by, or on behalf of, or for the use of, the Interstate Commission with respect to a regulated entity for the purpose of regulation or supervision of that entity;

(8) disclose information, the premature disclosure of which would significantly endanger the life of a person or the stability of a regulated entity; or

(9) specifically relate to the Interstate Commission's issuance of a subpoena or its participation in a civil action or proceeding.

(G) For every meeting closed pursuant to this provision, the Interstate Commission's chief legal officer shall publicly certify that, in counsel's opinion, the meeting may be closed to the public and shall reference each relevant exemptive provision. The Interstate Commission shall keep minutes which shall fully and clearly describe all matters discussed in any meeting and shall provide a full and accurate summary of any actions taken, and the reasons therefor, including a description of each of the views expressed on any item and the record of any roll call vote. All documents considered in connection with any action must be identified in the minutes.

(H) The Interstate Commission shall collect standardized data concerning the interstate movement of offenders as directed through its bylaws and rules which shall specify the data to be collected, the means of collection and data exchange, and reporting requirements.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1160. Promulgation of rules and amendments; emergency rules.

(A) The Interstate Commission shall promulgate rules in order to effectively and efficiently achieve the purposes of the compact including transition rules governing administration of the compact during the period in which it is being considered and enacted by the states.

(B) Rulemaking shall occur pursuant to the criteria set forth in this article and the bylaws and rules adopted pursuant thereto. The rulemaking shall substantially conform to the principles of the federal Administrative Procedures Act, 5 U.S.C.S. Section 551 et seq., and the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C.S. app. 2, Section 1 et seq., as amended (hereinafter "APA").

(C) All rules and amendments shall become binding as of the date specified in each rule or amendment.

(D) If a majority of the legislatures of the compacting states rejects a rule, by enactment of a statute or resolution in the same manner used to adopt the compact, then the rule shall have no further force and effect in any compacting state.

(E) When promulgating a rule, the Interstate Commission shall:

(1) publish the proposed rule stating with particularity the text of the rule which is proposed and the reason for the proposed rule;

(2) allow persons to submit written data, facts, opinions, and arguments, which information must be publicly available;

(3) provide an opportunity for an informal hearing; and

(4) promulgate a final rule and its effective date, if appropriate, based on the rulemaking record.

(F) Not later than sixty days after a rule is promulgated, any interested person may file a petition in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia or in the federal district court where the Interstate Commission's principal office is located for judicial review of the rule. If the court finds that the Interstate Commission's action is not supported by substantial evidence, as defined in the APA, in the rulemaking record, the court shall hold the rule unlawful and set it aside.

(G) Subjects to be addressed within twelve months after the first meeting must at a minimum include:

(1) notice to victims and opportunity to be heard;

(2) offender registration and compliance;

(3) violations and returns;

(4) transfer procedures and forms;

(5) eligibility for transfer;

(6) collection of restitution and fees from offenders;

(7) data collection and reporting;

(8) the level of supervision to be provided by the receiving state;

(9) transition rules governing the operation of the compact and the Interstate Commission during all or part of the period between the effective date of the compact and the date on which the last eligible state adopts the compact; and

(10) mediation, arbitration, and dispute resolution.

The existing rules governing the operation of the previous compact superseded by this act shall be null and void twelve months after the first meeting of the Interstate Commission created hereunder.

(H) Upon determination by the Interstate Commission that an emergency exists, it may promulgate an emergency rule which shall become effective immediately upon adoption, provided that the usual rulemaking procedures provided hereunder shall be retroactively applied to the emergency rule as soon as reasonably possible, in no event later than ninety days after the effective date of the rule.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1170. Oversight of interstate movement of adult offenders; enforcement of compact; resolution of disputes among states; mediation.

(A) The Interstate Commission shall oversee the interstate movement of adult offenders in the compacting states and shall monitor such activities being administered in noncompacting states which may significantly affect compacting states.

(B) The courts and executive agencies in each compacting state shall enforce this compact and shall take all actions necessary and appropriate to effectuate the compact's purposes and intent. In any judicial or administrative proceeding in a compacting state pertaining to the subject matter of this compact which may affect the powers, responsibilities, or actions of the Interstate Commission, the Interstate Commission shall be entitled to receive all service of process in any proceeding and shall have standing to intervene in the proceeding for all purposes.

(1) The compacting states shall report to the Interstate Commission on issues or activities of concern to them, cooperate with, and support the Interstate Commission in the discharge of its duties and responsibilities.

(2) The Interstate Commission shall attempt to resolve any disputes or other issues which are subject to the compact and which may arise among compacting states and noncompacting states.

(3) The Interstate Commission shall enact a bylaw or promulgate a rule providing for both mediation and binding dispute resolution for disputes among the compacting states.

(C) The Interstate Commission, in the reasonable exercise of its discretion, shall enforce the provisions of this compact using any or all means set forth in Section 24-21-1200(B).

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1180. Establishment and operating costs; assessments from compacting states; accounting.

(A) The Interstate Commission shall pay or provide for the payment of the reasonable expenses of its establishment, organization, and ongoing activities.

(B) The Interstate Commission shall levy on and collect an annual assessment from each compacting state to cover the cost of the internal operations and activities of the Interstate Commission and its staff that must be in a total amount sufficient to cover the Interstate Commission's annual budget as approved each year. The aggregate annual assessment amount shall be allocated based upon a formula to be determined by the Interstate Commission, taking into consideration the population of the State and the volume of interstate movement of offenders in each compacting state and shall promulgate a rule binding upon all compacting states which governs the assessment.

(C) The Interstate Commission shall not incur any obligations of any kind prior to securing the funds adequate to meet the same; nor shall the Interstate Commission pledge the credit of any of the compacting states, except by and with the authority of the compacting state.

(D) The Interstate Commission shall keep accurate accounts of all receipts and disbursements. The receipts and disbursements of the Interstate Commission must be subject to the audit and accounting procedures established under its bylaws. However, all receipts and disbursements of funds handled by the Interstate Commission shall be audited yearly by a certified or licensed public accountant, and the report of the audit must be included in and become part of the annual report of the Interstate Commission.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1190. Compact membership eligibility; effective date; amendments.

(A) Any state is eligible to become a compacting state.

(B) The compact shall become effective and binding upon legislative enactment of the compact into law by no less than thirty-five of the states. The initial effective date must be the later of July 1, 2001, or upon enactment into law by the thirty-fifth jurisdiction. Thereafter, it shall become effective and binding as to any other compacting state, upon enactment of the compact into law by that state. The governors of nonmember states or their designees will be invited to participate in Interstate Commission activities on a nonvoting basis prior to adoption of the compact by all states and territories of the United States.

(C) Amendments to the compact may be proposed by the Interstate Commission for enactment by the compacting states. No amendment shall become effective and binding upon the Interstate Commission and the compacting states unless and until it is enacted into law by unanimous consent of the compacting states.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1200. Withdrawal; termination and other penalties for performance default by compacting state; legal actions; dissolution.

(A)(1) Once effective, the compact shall continue in force and remain binding upon each and every compacting state; provided, that a compacting state may withdraw from the compact by enacting a statute specifically repealing the statute which enacted the compact into law.

(2) The effective date of withdrawal is the effective date of the repeal.

(3) The withdrawing state shall immediately notify the chairperson of the Interstate Commission in writing upon the introduction of legislation repealing this compact in the withdrawing state.

(4) The Interstate Commission shall notify the other compacting states of the withdrawing state's intent to withdraw within sixty days of its receipt thereof.

(5) The withdrawing state is responsible for all assessments, obligations, and liabilities incurred through the effective date of withdrawal, including any obligations the performance of which extend beyond the effective date of withdrawal.

(6) Reinstatement following withdrawal of any compacting state shall occur upon the withdrawing state reenacting the compact or upon a later date as determined by the Interstate Commission.

(B)(1) If the Interstate Commission determines that any compacting state has at a time defaulted in the performance of any of its obligations or responsibilities under this compact, the bylaws or any duly promulgated rules, the Interstate Commission may impose any or all of the following penalties:

(a) fines, fees, and costs in amounts as are considered reasonable as fixed by the Interstate Commission;

(b) remedial training and technical assistance as directed by the Interstate Commission; or

(c) suspension and termination of membership in the compact. Suspension must be imposed only after all other reasonable means of securing compliance under the bylaws and rules have been exhausted. Immediate notice of suspension must be given by the Interstate Commission to the Governor, the Chief Justice of the State, the majority and minority leaders of the defaulting state's legislature, and the state commissions. The grounds for default include, but are not limited to, failure of a compacting state to perform the obligations or responsibilities imposed upon it by this compact, Interstate Commission bylaws, or duly promulgated rules. The Interstate Commission shall immediately notify the defaulting state in writing of the penalty imposed by the Interstate Commission on the defaulting state pending a cure of the default. The Interstate Commission shall stipulate the conditions and the time period within which the defaulting state must cure its default. If the defaulting state fails to cure the default within the time period specified by the Interstate Commission, in addition to any other penalties imposed herein, the defaulting state may be terminated from the compact upon an affirmative vote of a majority of the compacting states and all rights, privileges, and benefits conferred by this compact must be terminated from the effective date of suspension.

(2) Within sixty days of the effective date of termination of a defaulting state, the Interstate Commission shall notify the Governor, the Chief Justice, the majority and minority leaders of the defaulting state's legislature, and the state commissioners of the termination.

(3) The defaulting state is responsible for all assessments, obligations, and liabilities incurred through the effective date of termination including any obligations, the performance of which extends beyond the effective date of termination.

(4) The Interstate Commission shall not bear any costs relating to the defaulting state unless otherwise mutually agreed upon between the Interstate Commission and the defaulting state.

(5) Reinstatement following termination of any compacting state requires both a reenactment of the compact by the defaulting state and the approval of the Interstate Commission pursuant to the rules.

(C) The Interstate Commission may, by majority vote of the members, initiate legal action in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia or, at the discretion of the Interstate Commission, in the Federal District where the Interstate Commission has its offices to enforce compliance with the provisions of the compact, its duly promulgated rules and by-laws, against any compacting state in default. In the event judicial enforcement is necessary, the prevailing party must be awarded all costs of the litigation including reasonable attorney fees.

(D)(1) The compact dissolves effective upon the date of the withdrawal or default of the compacting state which reduces membership in the compact to one compacting state.

(2) Upon the dissolution of this compact, the compact becomes null and void and of no further force or effect, and the business and affairs of the Interstate Commission must be wound up, and any surplus funds must be distributed in accordance with the bylaws.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1210. Severability.

(A) The provisions of this compact must be severable, and if a phrase, clause, sentence, or provision is considered unenforceable, the remaining provisions of the compact must be enforceable.

(B) The provisions of this compact must be liberally constructed to effectuate its purposes.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

SECTION 24-21-1220. Construction and application.

(A)(1) Nothing in this article prevents the enforcement of another law of a compacting state that is consistent with this compact.

(2) All compacting states' laws conflicting with this compact are superseded to the extent of the conflict.

(B)(1) All lawful actions of the Interstate Commission, including all rules and bylaws promulgated by the Interstate Commission, are binding upon the compacting states.

(2) All agreements between the Interstate Commission and the compacting states are binding in accordance with their terms.

(3) Upon the request of a party to a conflict over meaning or interpretation of Interstate Commission actions, and upon a majority vote of the compacting states, the Interstate Commission may issue advisory opinions regarding the meaning or interpretation.

(4) In the event a provision of this compact exceeds the constitutional limits imposed on the legislature of a compacting state, the obligations, duties, powers, or jurisdiction sought to be conferred by the provision upon the Interstate Commission must be ineffective and the obligations, duties, powers, or jurisdiction must remain in the compacting state and must be exercised by the agency to which such obligations, duties, powers, or jurisdiction are delegated by law in effect at the time this compact becomes effective.

HISTORY: 2002 Act No. 273, Section 1.

ARTICLE 13.

DAY REPORTING CENTERS

SECTION 24-21-1300. Definitions.

(A) The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services may develop and operate day reporting centers within the State.

(B) "Day reporting center" means a state facility providing supervision of inmates or offenders placed on supervision, which includes, but is not limited to, mandatory reporting, program participation, drug testing, community service, and any other conditions as determined by the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

(C) "Eligible inmate" means a person sentenced to imprisonment for more than three months, excluding a person sentenced for:

(1) a violent crime, as provided for in Section 16-1-60;

(2) a Class A, B, or C felony, as provided for in Section 16-1-20;

(3) the following Class D felonies:

(a) robbery, as provided for in Section 16-11-325;

(b) disseminating obscene material to a minor twelve years of age or younger, as provided for in Section 16-15-355; and

(c) aggravated stalking, as provided for in Section 16-3-1730(C);

(4) an unclassified crime which carries a maximum term of imprisonment of fifteen years or more, as provided for in Section 16-1-10(D);

(5) the unclassified crime of assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature in which the original indictment was for an offense that would require registration as a sex offender, as provided for in Section 23-3-430; or

(6) a crime which requires a registration as a sex offender, as provided for in Section 23-3-430. "Eligible inmate" does not include a person who does not provide an approved in-state residence as determined jointly by the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

(D) "Eligible offender" means a person placed on probation, parole, community supervision, or any other supervision program operated by the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services, excluding a person sentenced for:

(1) a violent crime, as provided for in Section 16-1-60;

(2) a Class A, B, or C felony, as provided for in Section 16-1-20;

(3) the following Class D felonies:

(a) robbery, as provided for in Section 16-11-325;

(b) disseminating obscene material to a minor twelve years of age or younger, as provided for in Section 16-15-355; and

(c) aggravated stalking, as provided for in Section 16-3-1730(C);

(4) an unclassified crime which carries a maximum term of imprisonment of fifteen years or more, as provided for in Section 16-1-10(D);

(5) the unclassified crime of assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature in which the original indictment was for an offense that would require registration as a sex offender, as provided for in Section 23-3-430; or

(6) a crime which requires a registration as a sex offender, as provided for in Section 23-3-430. "Eligible offender" does not include a person who does not provide an approved in-state residence as determined jointly by the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

HISTORY: 2008 Act No. 284, Section 1, eff June 11, 2008.

SECTION 24-21-1310. Development and operation; inmate eligibility.

(A) Notwithstanding another provision of law, the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services may develop and operate day reporting centers for eligible inmates and eligible offenders, if the General Assembly appropriates funds to operate these centers. The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services shall develop policies, procedures, and guidelines for the operation of day reporting centers. The period of time an eligible inmate or offender is required to participate in a day reporting program and the individual terms and conditions of an eligible inmate's or offender's placement and participation are at the joint discretion of the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

(B) An inmate or offender has no right to be placed in a day reporting center. The Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services have absolute discretion to place an eligible inmate or offender in a day reporting center and nothing in this article may be construed to entitle an inmate or offender to participate in a day reporting center program.

HISTORY: 2008 Act No. 284, Section 1, eff June 11, 2008.

SECTION 24-21-1320. Conditions of placement; removal.

(A) An eligible inmate or offender placed in a day reporting center must agree to abide by the conditions established by the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services, which may include, but are not limited to:

(1) seek and maintain employment;

(2) participate in any educational, vocational training, counseling, or mentoring program recommended by the department;

(3) refrain from using alcohol or nonprescription medication; and

(4) pay a reasonable supervision fee, which may be waived by the department, that must be retained by the department to assist in funding this program.

(B) An eligible inmate or offender who fails to abide by the conditions established by the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services may be removed from the community and brought before an administrative hearing officer of the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services. The Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services is the sole authority for determining whether any condition has been violated and for determining the actions to be taken in response to the violation. A participant revoked from participation in a day reporting center may be subject to further criminal proceedings or the institution of internal disciplinary sanctions for violations of any conditions associated with his placement in the day reporting center program. An inmate who fails to report as instructed, or whose whereabouts are unknown, may be considered to be an escapee by the department and may be apprehended and returned to custody as any other inmate who is deemed an escapee by the department.

(C) If a sentence to a day reporting center is revoked, the inmate must serve the remainder of his sentence within the Department of Corrections.

HISTORY: 2008 Act No. 284, Section 1, eff June 11, 2008.

SECTION 24-21-1330. Pilot project day reporting center program; termination.

The pilot project day reporting center program terminates twelve months from its opening, unless extended by the General Assembly.

HISTORY: 2008 Act No. 284, Section 1, eff June 11, 2008.






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