South Carolina General Assembly
108th Session, 1989-1990
Journal of the Senate

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1990

Friday, February 23, 1990
(Local Session)

Indicates Matter Stricken
Indicates New Matter

The Senate assembled at 11:00 A.M., the hour to which it stood adjourned and was called to order by the ACTING PRESIDENT, Senator COURSON.

REPORT OF

THE JOINT INSURANCE STUDY COMMITTEE

FEBRUARY, 1990

TO THE HONORABLE CARROLL A. CAMPBELL, JR.

GOVERNOR OF SOUTH CAROLINA

THE HONORABLE PRESIDING OFFICERS

AND MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

The Joint Insurance Study Committee created in 1989 by Act 37, repealing Act 1143 of 1966 and Act 612 of 1971, submits herewith a report of its recent studies, recommendations and activities.

SENATE MEMBERS   HOUSE MEMBERS

Edward E. Saleeby, Chm.   William D. Boan, Vice-Chm.
John C. Land, III   Robert A. Kohn
Glenn F. McConnell   Joseph T. McElveen, Jr.
Peden B. McLeod   Robert N. McLellan
Thomas H. Pope, III   Luther L. Taylor, Jr.

GOVERNOR'S APPOINTEES   EX OFFICIO MEMBER

Charles M. Potok   John G. Richards
Dr. S. Travis Pritchett   Chief Insurance
Ronald D. Scheetz   Commissioner
Frank S. Smith, Jr.
Roland C. Young

STAFF

Mary Lou Price
Director of Research

503 Gressette
Columbia, S.C. 29202
734-2845

REPORT OF
THE JOINT INSURANCE STUDY COMMITTEE
FEBRUARY, 1990
TO THE HONORABLE CARROLL A. CAMPBELL, JR.,
GOVERNOR OF SOUTH CAROLINA
THE HONORABLE PRESIDING OFFICERS
AND MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

SENATE MEMBERS:

/s/Senator Edward E. Saleeby

/s/Senator John C. Land, III

/s/Senator Glenn F. McConnell

/s/Senator Peden B. McLeod

/s/Thomas H. Pope, Jr.

HOUSE MEMBERS:

/s/Representative William D. Boan

/s/Representative Robert A. Kohn

/s/Representative Joseph T. McElveen, Jr.

/s/Representative Robert N. McLellan

/s/Representative Luther L. Taylor, Jr.

GOVERNOR'S APPOINTEES:

/s/Mr. Charles M. Potok

/s/Dr. S. Travis Pritchett

/s/Mr. Ronald D. Scheetz

/s/Mr. Frank S. Smith, Jr.

/s/Mr. Roland C. Young

STAFF:

Mary Lou Price,
Director of Research

503 Gressette Building

Columbia, S.C. 29202

734-2845

The Joint Insurance Study Committee was created by Act 37, 1989, which amended Act 612, 1971 and Act 1161, 1974, to make a continuous study and investigation of all facets of the insurance industry and related laws including, but not limited to, the study of revisions to this state's insurance laws, and to the review of medical, automobile, and property insurance premium rates so as to recommend appropriate statutory or regulatory controls. This study committee combines The Joint Legislative Automobile Liability Insurance Study Committee and The Insurance Law Study Committee and provides for its members, powers, duties, staff and expenses to be similar to that of the aforementioned study committees.

COMMITTEE LEGISLATION ENACTED IN 1989

Heath Insurance Risk Pool Act - Act 127

An important piece of legislation which provides health insurance for people who have been unable to obtain coverage from any other source, including those who make too much money to qualify for Medicaid or those who are not yet sixty-five and are not eligible for Medicare. If certain eligibility requirements are met, people who have been South Carolina residents for at least six months and meet the certain circumstances such as being turned down for private health insurance coverage for health reasons, being accepted for private health insurance, but having an existing illness or condition excluded from coverage for more than 12 months, or paying health insurance premiums for comparable coverage that are more than the premium levels established by the law which created the Pool, may be covered by the Pool.

Benefits offered by Pool coverage are comparable to many private insurance plans. The Pool pays 80% of allowed charges for covered hospital inpatient and outpatient treatment, physician services and some other medical care. Individuals covered by the Pool pay the remaining 20% and must meet a $500 deductible each year before the Pool coverage begins to pay. Prescription drugs are covered at 50% after the deductible is met. There is no family coverage under the Pool. Each Pool policy is considered to be individual coverage.

Monthly premiums for Pool coverage are determined by a person's age and gender. The premiums of the five largest writers of health insurance are averaged formulating the premiums for the Pool. Any shortfall in Pool funds will be covered by assessments of insurance companies that sell health coverage in South Carolina. Blue Cross of South Carolina has been chosen by the Pool's Board of Directors as administrator and will process claims, determine eligibility and handle all services required to operate the Pool.

Venue of Appeal from Administrative Decisions - S.298, Act 27

Previous to the recodification of the Insurance Code, all appeals were brought in Richland County by agents whose licenses had been revoked or suspended, etc. During the recodification process the Richland County location was omitted causing Insurance Department officials to travel all over the State for appellate review. This bill restores Richland County as the location for appellate review.

Individual Accident and Health Insurance Rate Regulatory Authority-S.333, Act 90

This statutory amendment removes any doubt which existed as to the power of the Chief Insurance Commissioner to approve the rates for individual accident and health insurance before such rates are used.

COMMITTEE LEGISLATION PROPOSED FOR 1990 SESSION:

S.C. Windstorm and Hail Underwriting Association-S.1114, H.4375

As a result of the damage caused by Hurricane Hugo, some confusion has arisen regarding what perils are insured under policies written by the South Carolina Windstorm and Hail Underwriting Association. To clarify those coverages and to more accurately reflect the nature of the Association's liability, some members of the Insurance Commission have expressed a desire to amend the name of the Association to delete any reference to "storm" such that its name would be the South Carolina Wind and Hail Underwriting Association.

Fiscal Impact Required on Bills or Resolutions Dealing with Mandated Benefits for Health Insurance Coverage - S.1120

This piece of legislation emanated as a recommendation from the Select Committee on Health Care Cost Containment, a committee which has been established by the study committee to study the rising cost of health care coverage. The bill requires a fiscal impact statement attached to it after it has been read across the desk of either body, but before it leaves the standing committee to which it has been sent. The fiscal impact will be furnished by the Division of Research and Statistics, with final approval by the Chief Insurance Commissioner. It will hopefully become a deterrent to mandated legislation dealing with health insurance coverage, and make a small, but significant dent in the rising cost of health care coverage.

Confidentiality of Special Reports - S.1121, H.4452

The Commissioner currently has the power to require any insurer to respond to inquiries relating to its transaction of the business of insurance in this State. By statute, the responses to these inquiries are confidential. The Commissioner recommends that the confidentiality provision be specifically extended to include the work papers and draft reports of financial examiners performing statutorily-required examinations to protect the integrity of such papers. An amendment in committee puts in language on disclosure which was omitted by Legislative Council when the bill was originally drafted. The amendment also sets up in what instances disclosures may be allowed.

Definition of Life Insurance - S.1155, H.4371

In the past few years, life insurance companies have developed products which provide early payout of a portion of the face amount of the policy under certain conditions. To specifically allow for the sale and approval of policies with such benefits, it was recommended that legislation to either amend the definition of life insurance or exclude such policies from the definition of accident and health insurance be introduced. This bill was amended in committee changing the language so that it clarifies that the policies to be sold deal with life policies and have no connotation that they deal with accident and health insurance.

New Standards for Group Medicare Policies - S.1153, H.4372

In January of 1989, the Chief Insurance Commissioner promulgated Regulation 69-46, which established new standards for Medicare Supplement policies as required by the Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988. In conformity with those new requirements, it is necessary that Section 38-71-730(6) be amended to require that group Medicare policies meet or exceed the minimum standards for such policies as provided in Regulation 69-46.

Licensing of Foreign Premium Service Companies - S.1171, H.4373

This piece of legislation pertains to the statutory requirements for licensing of premium service companies which currently contain no specific requirement that such companies, if foreign, be regulated and subject to financial examination by their state of domicile. To ensure the financial integrity of premium service companies domiciled in other states, but doing business in this State, the Commissioner recommends that foreign premium service companies be regulated and examined by the insurance department in its state of domicile. He feels that there are eleven states that are not presently regulated or examined at all. If they are not being regulated or examined in their own state, he feels they should not be licensed in South Carolina. Amended in committee the word "insurance" was changed to "appropriate" because there are twelve states that regulate and examine the premium service companies by departments other than insurance departments. Ten are regulated by the State Banking Departments and two by the Department of Consumer Affairs.

Authorization of Chief Insurance Committee to Request Quarterly Reports - S.1154, H.4374

All insurers licensed to transact business in this State are required by statute to submit, on an annual basis, financial statements reflecting their financial condition. The Commissioner recommended that the statute be amended to prescribe the form and manner in which the statement is prepared and to provide specifically that quarterly financial reports and any additional information deemed necessary may be required. Amended in committee, the Commissioner requested the deletion of certain language which the department felt was counter to what the original bill was trying to accomplish. The Commissioner will still retain the authority to make companies file quarterly reports.

Chief Insurance Commissioner Authorized Access to Insurer's Records not Papers - S.1152, H.4375

The Commissioner is required by statute to examine each insurance company domiciled in South Carolina every five years. In connection with that examination, the Commissioner is allowed access to all books and papers of that insurer. To assure that the appropriate books and records are made available for the examination, the Commissioner recommended that the statute be amended to require that the company's original books and records be supplied.

Domestic Insurers Required to Maintain Books in South Carolina - S.1156, H.4376

The law currently requires that insurers seeking to be domiciled in South Carolina locate and maintain their principal place of business and primary executive, administrative and home offices in South Carolina. To assist in the appropriate regulation of our domestic insurers, the Commissioner recommended that the law be amended to require that all original books and records of such insurers be maintained in this State.

Amended in committee, domestic health maintenance organizations were added to the provisions of the bill. At present, all domestic HMO's maintain their books in South Carolina.

Definition of Annuity - S.1170, H.4377

Many life insurance companies now market single premium immediate annuities which provide periodic payments for a fixed period of time without regard for the continuance of human life. Such annuities cannot be approved in this State, because the statutory definition of annuities provides that payments be "dependent upon the continuation of human life." Therefore, the Commissioner recommended that the definition of annuity be revised to remove the reference to the continuance of human life.

Health Insurance Risk Pool Bill Amended - S.1197, H.4590

At the recommendation of the Board of Directors of the Health Insurance Risk Pool, this bill makes several technical adjustments to Act 127 of 1989, which established the Pool. The legislation revises the definition of the Board, deletes the reference to the Board of Directors of the Pool and provides for the Board to consist of the Directors, provides for the Pool to have the powers granted by law to insurance companies licensed to transact accident and health insurance instead of referring to insurance as defined in the act, revises who may apply for Pool coverage and the exception for exclusions from Pool coverage, and defines an unfair trade practice for an agent, an employer, and a member participating in the Pool.

Long Term Care Insurance Act - S.1209, H.4611

In 1988, the South Carolina General Assembly passed the Long Term Care Insurance Act, which was based on the model developed by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. Subsequent to its passage, the NAIC made amendments to the model act. This bill amends the South Carolina Long Term Care Insurance Act, including reducing the pre-existing conditions from 12 months to 6 months, and deleting "prior hospitalization."

PENDING LEGISLATION FROM 1989

The Automobile Study Committee had one recommendation from the South Carolina Department of Insurance to consider for 1989 which did not pass the General Assembly. This bill concerned collision damage waivers sold by rental car companies. Testimony was heard setting forth some definitions governing the rental of passenger vehicles and limiting the liability which could be incurred by the renter of a passenger vehicle as specified. The bill provided that a rental company should not require the purchase of optional insurance or any other optional good or service and should not engage in any unfair, deceptive, or coercive conduct, as specified, to induce the renter to do so. It also placed restrictions on the advertising of rental car rates and prohibited mandatory fees or surcharges, including but not limited to, required fuel or airport surcharges in addition to the rental rate, as specified. With some questions still pending between the Insurance Department and the rental car companies, the committee recommended that this matter be resolved between the two parties.

AUTOMOBILE STUDY COMMITTEE ACTIVITY

The staff was asked to review all proposals on automobile insurance reform that the committee had considered over the past five years. A public hearing was then scheduled in January, 1989, when thirty-nine recommendations were brought before the committee. From those recommendations a bill was drafted, S.588, sponsored by the Senate members of the committee. Simultaneously, the Insurance Subcommittee of the House Labor, Commerce and Industry Committee also introduced a bill, H.3695 on automobile insurance reform. H.3747, introduced by Representatives T. Rogers, J. Bailey, et al, became a major force in the House bill, and the final version of H.3695 which passed the House of Representatives was a combination of these two pieces of legislation.

S. 588 came out of the Banking and Insurance Committee and was debated at great length with many amendments. Upon passage of the Senate bill, the House refused to concur and a conference committee was appointed. After days of deliberations and compromises, H.3695 came out of conference committee and passed both Houses. Major provisions of the final version were: mandatory safety belt enforcement, a mandated rate reduction of 5% of all insureds as justified by the seatbelt law and other provisions in the bill, a reduction in the recoupment fee for "0" merit rating point drivers, and an increase in the recoupment fee for drivers who fail the objective standards, based on a thirty-six month driving record, limits on the mandate to write to 250/500/50 or 500 single limit liability, removal of the mandate to write personal injury protection and disallows assignment, subrogation or set off of PIP, medical payments or economic loss coverage, increase of the safe driver discount to 20%, requirement of the Chief Insurance Commissioner to promulgate 240 uniform class plans for insurance, approval by Chief Insurance Commissioner of a form for insurers to use in offering optional coverages to be offered to applicants, revision of Chief Insurance Commissioner's power on rates, a fine for a driver who lapses his insurance coverage, and if so the requirement for the driver to provide the Highway Department proof of insurance, reduction of the cession limitation from 40% to 35% to the Reinsurance Facility, allowance for policies with credits and discounts to be ceded to the Reinsurance Facility, addition of four new members to the Reinsurance Facility Board including the Consumer Advocate, uninsured and underinsured motorist cover need not be provided in any excess or umbrella policy, a raise of the reinstatement fee to $200 if policy lapses, but $5.00 for voluntary surrender, a reduction of the costs of MVR's from $4.00 to $2.00, an allowance of intervention by the Consumer Advocate in the rate making process and in federal court, making insurance fraud a felony, making it a violation of the Unfair Trade Practices Statute to overcharge in insurance cases, and the requirement of all policies ceded to the Reinsurance Facility to have a $250 deductible on comprehensive and collision coverage, excluding safety glass.

SELECT COMMITTEE ON HEALTH CARE COST CONTAINMENT

In the spring of 1989, the Joint Insurance Study Committee created the Select Committee on Health Care Cost Containment. In June this committee held its organizational meeting. The Select Committee membership represents a broad spectrum of the South Carolina consumer, business and professional community. This was an attempt to bring into membership all of those parties that are involved and play a role in the health care system. This committee is well balanced and represents individuals who are devoting substantial time in a sincere effort to fulfill its mission. The committee was charged to develop legislative and administrative strategies designed to slow the rate of increase in the cost of health care services in South Carolina. In six months, the Select Committee has met numerous times to evaluate the scope, define the problem, and hear expert testimony from various professionals in South Carolina. Because of the vast scope and the number of various participants and industries involved in the health care delivery system, the committee elected to create working subcommittees to examine various approaches to cost containment that may be applicable to South Carolina. Five working subcommittees are looking at health care institutions, providers, the role of regulation, and the insurance industry.

The effectiveness and equity of the health care system has been a major concern of many Americans since the 1940's. The continual debate over national health insurance and socialized medicine was temporarily abated with the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in the mid 1960's by providing insurance to older Americans and to the poor. Since then, however, other important issued have emerged on the social agenda.

In recent years the portion of America's gross national product devoted to health care has more than doubled. Hospital costs have risen at more than twice the rate of any other good or service that the average citizen needs. There are still questions of whether this massive spending has improved the health of Americans or removed the major obstacles to a more equitable system; that of providing better access to health care for all American's regardless of geographic location or economic status.

The United States spends more each year on health care than it does on national defense. Individual Americans spend more annually on health care than on automobiles and gasoline combined. Yet while military affairs, gas prices and the latest automotive-styling gimmicks are analyzed in detail, few people understand the complexity of the health care delivery system.

The World War II years saw a sharp increase in the number of physicians and nurses with scientific training. Tending the wounds of combat, they received a solemn opportunity to hone their skills and develop new techniques. By the 1940's everyone had heard of miracle drugs and many knew that they owed their lives to them.

During the 1950's and '60's came vaccines against polio and measles and the beginning of high medical technology - respirators, dialyzers and "nuclear" medicine. Vaccines and medical machines combined with antibiotics, would transform our image of doctors. No longer were they artisans with limited knowledge who did what they could to mitigate suffering. Now, people expected to leave the doctor's office healed. And in turn, as Americans began to anticipate visiting doctors and hospitals many times during the course of a lifetime, they grew concerned over how they would pay for all that, and private health insurance grew rapidly in response.

The reason that we should be concerned about the escalation of cost is simply that more than $425 billion each year goes for health care expenditures, 90% of which is paid for by private insurance or Medicare and Medicaid. The federal government has become the single most important third party payer or consumer/purchaser of health care. Out of every dollar spent by the federal government, 12 goes for health care with 9 going directly for hospital reimbursements. The costs of Medicare and Medicaid have risen dramatically since their inception. The national cost of Medicare has risen from $4.5 billion in 1967 to nearly $66 billion in 1985, a rise of nearly 1466%. In 1980, Medicaid paid over $21 billion in benefits. In just over a decade, this amount has risen 500% from the over $4 billion that was paid in 1969.

These increasing federal expenditures for health care have provoked considerable debate and discussion over how costs should be contained. Many recognize that increased federal involvement in the provision of health care and the regulation of the health care industry have contributed to the inflationary economy of the health care sector.

As health care costs continue to rise at a rate of approximately 6.5%, it is useful to identify some of the most common explanations cited for this increase. According to research conducted by Hewitt Associates, an employee benefits consulting firm, the three largest contributors to the average premium increase are:

Medical inflation   7.0%

Cost shift   6.4%

Increased utilization   3.5%

Their analysis also reveals the largest contributors to the increase in health care cost in 1989, showing a similar trend:

Medical inflation   32.8%

Cost shift   29.5%

Utilization   16.3%

There is no evidence that South Carolina is an exception to this national trend. In fact it can be speculated that the cost shifting problem may be much worse in South Carolina due to the larger proportion of Medicaid patients. According to the latest information (1989) from The Northwestern National Life Insurance Company, South Carolina ranks 46th in the United States in overall health, 49th in life expectancy, 49th in low birth weight, 43rd in major reportable diseases and 48th in population without insurance.

With respect to the Duke University study on Health Care for the Medically Indigent of South Carolina, each year, more than 350,000 people in South Carolina are served through Medicaid. Yet, even with Medicaid in place, there are at least 350,000 others who fail to pay all or part of their hospital or doctor bills. Apart from patients unable to pay for their care, there are nearly 200,000 a year who elect not to obtain needed health services, principally due to inability to pay for them.

Each year, there are at least 950,000 "at risk" of becoming medically indigent in South Carolina or more than one-fourth of the state's population. "At risk" means uninsured for part of the year, underinsured private, underinsured Medicare, and underinsured all year. There are 330,000 who have no form of health insurance whatsoever for the entire year. There are another 200,000 who have insurance (principally Medicaid) only part of the year. There are also 380,000 individuals in South Carolina who could be classified as underinsured. Even though those "at risk" of becoming medically indigent constitute more than one-fourth of South Carolina's population, nearly three times larger than the Medicaid population, evidence suggests that that fraction is no higher than in other neighboring states or even in the nation as a whole.

In the past the federal government has taken the lead in health care cost containment efforts. However, recently individual states have taken the initiative to seek innovative solutions to their own health care financial problems. Over the last six months, forty states have examined over 300 reform bills.

Health care involves millions of economic transactions between buyers and sellers of goods and services. Consumers buy physical exams, health care, and aspirin, among other things. Physicians provide a wide variety of services ranging from prescribing a cold remedy to performing open heart surgery. Hospitals act as sellers of such things as patient care, laboratory tests or X-rays, and as buyers of a myriad of items as diverse as tissue paper to CT scanners.

In 1983, an amendment to the Social Security Act changed the way Medicare reimbursed hospitals for their services. The 1983 legislation required that hospitals be reimbursed from a prospective payment system rather than a retrospective system. The prospective payment system required hospitals to charge patients at a predetermined rate, which was based on the average cost of treating particular diagnoses. The purpose of the legislation was obviously to control the increasing cost of health care supported by the federal government through Medicare.

The Select Committee, in the short time frame of its existence, has heard valued testimony from a great number of witnesses. The topics include: medical ethics; presentations from the S.C. Medical Association's Study, "Health Care 2000"; The S.C. Hospital Association's Study, "A Healthy Future for South Carolina"; and the S.C. Medicaid Program by a representative from Health and Human Services Finance Commission, a pilot program by The S.C. Institute on Poverty and Deprivation, and a presentation on uninsured alternatives. The committee still has a number of potential cost saving areas to explore. They range from health care fraud to durable power of attorneys and living wills to wellness programs, and programs being considered by other states.

OTHER COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES

In addition to committee meetings and other legislative duties, committee members and staff participated in meetings and seminars of the National Conference of Insurance Legislators. Senator Edward E. Saleeby and Senator Glenn F. McConnell serve on the Executive Committee of COIL as well as several other committees for this organization. The committee's staff is one of the few state staffers to be asked to participate on the COIL staff of Insurance Legislators. COIL seminars and meetings provide our state legislators the opportunity of meeting with state legislators from other states to exchange ideas and also to obtain an insight of various insurance problems, laws and proposed changes considered in other states.

The committee's staff continued to work closely with the Department of Insurance, attending the Insurance Commission's monthly meetings. Staff has also served on several panels and participated in seminars dealing with insurance. Attendance at the National Association of Insurance Commissioner's meetings have been invaluable, as the progress of model acts which this association produces is readily available for staff to pass on to committee members.

(On motion of Senator SALEEBY, with unanimous consent, the Report was ordered printed in the Journal and fifty additional copies of the Report were ordered to be printed.)

ORDERED ENROLLED FOR RATIFICATION

The following Joint Resolutions were read the third time and having received three readings in both Houses, it was ordered that the titles thereof be changed to that of Acts and same enrolled for Ratification:

H. 4563 -- Education and Public Works Committee: A JOINT RESOLUTION TO APPROVE REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION, RELATING TO REQUIREMENTS FOR ADDITIONAL AREAS OF CERTIFICATION, DESIGNATED AS REGULATION DOCUMENT NUMBER 1196, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF ARTICLE 1, CHAPTER 23, TITLE 1 OF THE 1976 CODE.

(By prior motion of Senator GIESE, with unanimous consent)

H. 4566 -- Education and Public Works Committee: A JOINT RESOLUTION TO APPROVE REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION, RELATING TO POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UTILIZED BY THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION IN THE APPROVAL OF TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS OFFERED BY COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN SOUTH CAROLINA, DESIGNATED AS REGULATION DOCUMENT NUMBER 1197, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF ARTICLE 1, CHAPTER 23, TITLE 1 OF THE 1976 CODE.

(By prior motion of Senator GIESE, with unanimous consent)

HOUSE BILL RETURNED

The following House Bill was read the third time, passed and ordered returned to the House with amendments:

H. 4461 -- Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs Committee: A BILL TO RE-ENACT SECTION 23-23-30, CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, RELATING TO THE CREATION AND MEMBERSHIP OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING COUNCIL.

(By prior motion of Senator LOURIE, with unanimous consent)

THIRD READING BILLS

The following Bills were severally read the third time, passed and ordered sent to the House of Representatives:

S. 961 -- Senator Rose: A BILL TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING SECTION 17-15-240 SO AS TO REQUIRE BAIL BOND MONEY TO BE DEPOSITED IN INTEREST-BEARING ACCOUNTS, TO PROVIDE THAT THE INTEREST ON THESE ACCOUNTS IS PUBLIC FUNDS, TO PROVIDE FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE INTEREST, AND TO AUTHORIZE SOUTH CAROLINA COURT ADMINISTRATION TO PRESCRIBE PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING AND ACCOUNTING FOR BAIL BOND INTEREST.

(By prior motion of Senator ROSE, with unanimous consent)

S. 1198 -- Senators Setzler and Giese: A BILL TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING SECTION 59-25-115 SO AS TO PROVIDE THAT PERSONS APPLYING FOR INITIAL CERTIFICATION TO BECOME CERTIFIED EDUCATION PERSONNEL SHALL UNDERGO CERTAIN FINGERPRINT REVIEWS, AND TO PROVIDE THAT THE FEES CHARGED FOR THESE REVIEWS MUST BE PAID BY THE APPLICANT.

(By prior motion of Senator SETZLER, with unanimous consent)

SECOND READING BILLS

The following Bills having been read the second time were passed and ordered to a third reading:

S. 1323 -- Senator Land: A BILL TO AMEND ACT 375 OF 1947, AS AMENDED, CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, RELATING TO THE CLARENDON HOSPITAL DISTRICT AND ITS BOARD OF TRUSTEES, SO AS TO PROVIDE THAT THE EX OFFICIO MEMBER OF THE BOARD WHO IS THE CHIEF OF THE MEDICAL STAFF OF THE CLARENDON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL SHALL HAVE VOTING PRIVILEGES.

(By prior motion of Senator LAND, with unanimous consent)

S. 1325 -- Banking and Insurance Committee: A BILL TO AMEND SECTION 34-1-20, CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, RELATING TO THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE STATE BOARD OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, SO AS TO INCREASE THE MEMBERSHIP FROM NINE TO TEN MEMBERS AND TO SPECIFY THAT ONE MEMBER MUST BE APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR UPON THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE ASSOCIATION OF SUPERVISED LENDERS AND ONE MEMBER MUST BE APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR WHO IS ENGAGED IN THE LICENSED CONSUMER FINANCE BUSINESS AS A RESTRICTED LENDER UPON THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE ASSOCIATION OF RESTRICTED LENDERS.

(By prior motion of Senator MOORE, with unanimous consent)

ADJOURNMENT

At 11:38 A.M., on motion of Senator SETZLER, the Senate adjourned to meet next Tuesday at 11:00 A.M.

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